Graphic: An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand 1966.

MINING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

MINING AND MINERAL RESOURCES

The exploitation of New Zealand's mineral resources began in the sixties with the gold rushes which stimulated development by profitable gold exports. With the exhaustion of these early fields, mineral production fell away. It certainly lacked variety as far as large-scale mining was concerned, but the commonly accepted belief that the country was virtually devoid of economic minerals was far from the truth. Admittedly the production of industrial (i.e., non-metallic) minerals, mineral fuels, geothermal steam, and ground water has increased markedly in recent years while that of metallic ores has dropped. But within the last few years prospecting for iron, aluminium, and uranium has been very active, even when compared with the considerable prospecting demands of industrial minerals – coal, oil, and steam.

Next Part: Regulations


The Story


Contents

 


Warning

This information was published in 1966 in An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock. It has not been corrected and will not be updated.

Up-to-date information can be found elsewhere in Te Ara.


Browse the 1966 Encyclopaedia of New Zealand
ABCDEFGH
IJKLMNOPQ
RSTUVWXYZ