Graphic: An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand 1966.

EXPATRIATES — BIOGRAPHIES

UNITED KINGDOM

The following is a selected list, far from complete, of New Zealanders in the United Kingdom who have made names for themselves in their respective professions. The names have been arranged alphabetically within a broad professional classification. Distinguished New Zealanders, now deceased, such as Lord Rutherford and Harold Williams, are treated elsewhere.

1. Armed Services

Among those who have risen to high rank in the British Army may be mentioned the late Major-General D. C. Monro (1886–1960), of Palmerston North. He served in the RAMC from 1915 to 1948.

Barnett, Air Chief Marshal Sir Denis Hensley Fulton, K.C.B., C.B.E., D.F.C.

(1906– ).

Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Royal Air Force Near East Forces, and Commander of British Forces in Cyprus.

Sir Denis Barnett was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 11 February 1906, the younger son of Sir Louis Barnett. He was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, and before proceeding to Cambridge studied for a year at the University of Otago. At Clare College, Cambridge, he graduated B.A. in 1929 and M.A. in 1935. He received a permanent commission in the RAF in 1929 and has held numerous positions, both in the United Kingdom and overseas, including Air Ministry posts and command of the RAF Staff College at Bracknell, the Allied Air Task Force in the Near East, and Transport Command. During the Second World War he was awarded the D.F.C. and C.B.E. He was made K.C.B. in 1957 and has been honoured by America and France as well — United States Legion of Merit (Commander), French Legion d'Honneur (Commandeur), and Croix de Guerre. Since July 1962 Sir Denis has been Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, RAF Near East Air Forces, Commander of British Forces in Cyprus, and Administrator of the Sovereign base areas at Akrotire and Dhakelia.

Broughton, Air Vice-Marshal Charles, C.B., C.B.E.

(1911– ).

Director-General of Organisation, Air Ministry.

Charles Broughton was born in New Zealand in 1911 and was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School. He commenced his Air Force career as a cadet at the RAF College, Cranwell, in 1930. He was commissioned in 1932 and posted to India from 1933 to 1936. He was a flying instructor for two years before the war and was then attached to Coastal Command from 1941 to 1943. The following three years he spent in the Middle East. Since 1947 he has served in Flying Training Command, the Air Ministry, the Imperial Defence College, and Transport Command, apart from two further periods overseas at Washington D.C. and in the Far East. Since 1961 he has been Director of Organisation at the Air Ministry in London.

Carr, Air Marshal Sir Charles Roderick, K.B.E., C.B., D.F.C.

(1891– ).

King of Arms for the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

Sir Roderick Carr was born at Feilding, New Zealand, on 31 August 1891 and was educated at Wellington College. He served with New Zealand Forces, the RNAS and the RAF in the First World War. In 1919 he worked with the North Russian Expedition and the following year he was Chief of Air Staff in Lithuania. He was a member of Shackleton's Antarctic expedition in 1921–22 and in 1927 made the first RAF non-stop flight from England to the Persian Gulf. Sir Roderick was with the RAF in Egypt from 1929–33 and with the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle in Chinese waters 1936–39. He was mentioned in dispatches during his term as Officer Commanding No. 4 Group, Bomber Command, 1941–45. In the final year of the war he was Deputy Chief of Staff (Air) at Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Force, and after a year in India he retired. He is a Commander of the Legion d'Honneur and Croix de Guerre (France) and Commander of the Orders of St. Anne and St. Stanislav (Russia). Since 1947 Sir Roderick has been King of Arms for the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

Clouston, Air Commodore Arthur Edmond, C.B., D.S.O., D.F.C., A.F.C. and Bar

(1908– ).

Royal Air Force (retired).

Air Commodore Clouston was born at Motueka, New Zealand, on 7 April 1908. He joined the RAF, taking his commission in 1930. In 1938 he made several record longdistance flights, England – New Zealand, and England — Cape Town and back. During the Second World War he served in the Battle of Britain (Spitfires) and afterwards flew Beaufighters with Coastal Command. About this time he did some test flying. In 1947 he accepted an appointment as Director of Civil Aviation in New Zealand and, shortly afterwards, was seconded to the RNZAF. In 1949 he returned to England as Commandant of the Empire Test-pilots School. From 1954 to 1957 he was Air Officer Commanding at Singapore and, for the next three years, Commandant at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Amesbury. Air Commodore Clouston retired from the RAF in 1960. He has published The Dangerous Skies (1954).

Deere, Group Captain Alan Christopher, D.S.O., O.B.E., D.F.C.

(1917– ).

Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty the Queen.

Alan Christopher Deere was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 12 December 1917 and was educated at Marist Brothers' School and at Wanganui Technical College. He spent two years as a law clerk before winning a commission in the RAF in 1937. After distinguished war service in the Battle of Britain and at Dunkirk, he was permanently commissioned in the RAF in 1945. Since the war he has held command positions at RAF stations, directed the RAF Staff College from 1957 to 1960, was Deputy Director of Personnel at the Air Ministry, 1960–61, and at present (1963) is at the Imperial Defence College. In 1959 Hodder and Stoughton published his book Nine Lives. In 1961 Group Captain Deere was appointed Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty the Queen.

Elworthy, Air Chief Marshal Sir Samuel Charies, G.C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., M.V.O., D.F.C., A.F.C.

(1911– ).

Chief of Air Staff.

Sir Charles Elworthy was born at Timaru, New Zealand, on 23 March 1911. He was sent to England to Marlborough College and later went to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1933 with an honours degree in law, being called to the London Bar two years later. In 1935 he received a permanent commission of the RAF. During the early part of the war he commanded No. 82 Squadron and was awarded the D.S.O., D.F.C., and A.F.C. In April 1943 he became Duty Deputy, Supreme Command, Air Staff, at Bomber Command, and in September of the following year he was promoted to Senior Air Officer at the bomber group. After the war he held various appointments; for a short time he commanded the Royal Pakistan Air Force. From 1957 to 1959 he was Commandant of the RAF Staff College at Bracknell. In that year he became Deputy Chief of Air Staff and later (1960) was appointed Commander-in-Chief of British Forces in the Arabian Peninsula. He was knighted (K.C.B.) in 1961 and became Chief of Air Staff in Britain in September 1962.

Findlay, Air Commodore James Lloyd, C.B.E., M.C.

(1895– ).

Royal New Zealand Air Force (retired).

James Lloyd Findlay was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 6 October 1895, the son of Sir John Findlay. He was educated at Wellington College before studying at the Imperial Service College, England, where he was subsequently captain of the school. He was in the East Survey Regiment and was wounded at the Somme in 1916. The following year he joined the RFC, and as early as 1923 was one of the first officers with the New Zealand Permanent Air Force. He also served in the Second World War in Coastal Command, but was recalled to New Zealand to command Central Group, RNZAF. In 1954 he retired in London, after spending 10 years as head of the New Zealand Joint Staff Mission and as Air Attache in Washington D.C. Air Commodore Findlay is a Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur and Commander of Legion of Merit, U.S.A.

Hartgill, Major-General William Clavering, C.B., O.B.E., M.C. and Bar

(1888– ).

Royal Army Medical Corps (retired).

William Clavering Hartgill was born at Dannevirke, New Zealand, on 1 January 1888 and was educated at Wanganui Collegiate and at the University of Otago. He did post-graduate work at London Hospital and qualified M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. In 1914 he joined the RAMC. He served during the First World War, when he was mentioned in dispatches, received the Military Cross and Bar, and was decorated with the Medaille de la Reconnaissance en Argent. In 1920 he served in the Somaliland campaign. During the Second World War he again saw active service and was once more mentioned in dispatches and decorated, this time O.B.E., C.B., and a Commander of the Legion of Merit (U.S.A.). In 1942 he was Chairman of the War Office Committee on Reorganisation of Medical Services in the Field. He retired from the Army in 1947 with the rank of Major-General.

Hughes, Acting Air Vice-Marshal Sidney Weetman Rochford, C.B.E., A.F.C., D.F.C.

(GREECE), (1914– ).

Chairman of the Defence Research Policy Staff, Ministry of Defence, London.

Sidney Weetman Rochford Hughes was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 25 October 1914 and was educated at Waitaki Boys' High School (1929–32). From 1933 to 1937 he was on the editorial staff of the New Zealand Herald. He was selected for No. 1 Pilot Training Course at Wigram in 1937 and transferred to the RAF in the following year. He served in RAF Sunderlands in Far and Middle East until 1941 and was twice decorated for gallantry. In 1942 he commanded the Middle East Air-Sea Rescue and Reconnaissance Flight in the Western Desert and, following a term of staff duties at headquarters, Middle East, he commanded 511 Squadron in the United Kingdom in the first two years after the war. While on exchange with the United States Air Force he served as Chief of Operations, All Weather Flying Division. He later commanded the RAF Experimental Flying Department at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Faraborough, for three years and a tactical fighter base in Germany for four years. His present position is that of Chairman of the Defence Research Policy Staff in the Ministry of Defence, London.

McGregor, Air Marshal Sir Hector Douglas, K.C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O.

(1910– ).

Commander-in-Chief, Far Eastern Air Force, Singapore.

Hector McGregor was born at Wairoa, New Zealand, on 15 February 1910. He was educated at Napier Boys' High School and joined the RAF when he was 18. When the Second World War broke out he was officer commanding a fighter squadron and his exploits in this capacity won him the D.S.O. In 1941 he was on the Special Planning Staff and in 1943 he became Deputy Director Operations, Intelligence, and Plans, Mediterranean Allied Air Forces. He spent 1948–49 with the Air Ministry before being posted for a two-year term with NATO Standing Group in Washington D.C. From 1951 to 1953 he was First Officer Commanding 2 Group in Germany. He then spent three years with the Ministry of Supply, where he was Director of Guided Missile Development for two years and Assistant Controller of Aircraft for one. From 1957 till his present appointment he was Chief of Staff (Air Defence) at SHAPE in Paris. He was knighted in 1960 and received a United States Legion of Merit award in 1945. In 1959 Sir Hector became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Fighter Command. He relinquished this post in June 1962 when he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of Britain's Far East Air Force in Singapore.

Maclean, Air Vice-Marshal Cuthbert Trelawder, C.B., D.S.O., M.C.

(1886– ).

Royal Air Force (retired).

Cuthbert T. Maclean was born at Wanganui, on 18 October 1886 and was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School and Auckland University College. During the First World War he served in the armed forces, and in 1915 was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps and transferred to the RAF three years later. He was Officer Commanding British Forces in Aden from 1929 to 1931, when he spent three years at the Air Ministry as Director of Postings. From 1934 to 1938 he was Air Officer Commanding the RAF in the Middle East. He then took over a bomber group until his retirement in 1940. He has been honoured as Chevalier, Legion d'Honneur.

Tacon, Air Commodore Edward William, C.B.E., D.S.O., M.V.O., D.F.C. and Bar, A.F.C. and Bar

(1917– ).

Commander R.A.F. units in Persian Gulf.

Air Commodore Tacon was born at Napier, New Zealand, on 6 December 1917. He was educated at Hastings High School and St. Patrick's College, Silverstream, before joining the New Zealand Railways as a cadet. Tacon began his aviation career as a trainee with the Hawke's Bay – East Coast Aero Club. In 1938 he joined the RNZAF and transferred to the RAF in the following year, where he saw active service from 1939 to 1944, when he became a prisoner of war. From 1946 to 1950 he commanded the King's Flight. He then attended the RAF Flying College and was promoted to Wing Commander (1952) and Group Captain (1958). On 30 November 1961 he was appointed Commander of the RAF in the Persian Gulf, with his headquarters at Bahrain.

Thomas, Acting Brigadier Walter Babington, D.S.O., M.C. and Bar

(1919– ).

Walter Babington Thomas was born at Motueka, New Zealand, on 29 June 1919 and was educated at the Motueka District High School. He spent two years (1937–39) as a bank clerk there and was a member of the local territorials. At the outbreak of war he received his commission and served with the 23rd Battalion, Second Echelon, in the United Kingdom (1940) and in Greece and Crete, where he was wounded and taken prisoner. He escaped through Turkey and served in the Western Desert, Libya, Tripolitania, Tunis, and Italy. At the end of the war he was in the British Commonwealth Occupation Force in Japan till the end of 1946. In 1947 he transferred to the Royal Hampshire Regiment and has served in Germany, Kenya, Malaya, and Australia. Brigadier Thomas is Acting Commander A Force, Aden Protectorate Levies. He is well known for his book Dare to be Free, which is based upon his experiences as a prisoner of war, and for The Touch of Pitch, a novel about the Mau Mau in Kenya.

Trent, Group Captain Leonard Henry, V.C., D.F.C.

(1915– ).

Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty the Queen.

Leonard Henry Trent was born at Nelson, New Zealand, on 14 April 1915. He was educated at Nelson College, 1928–34, then spent two years with a commercial firm before joining the RNZAF in 1937. In the following year he joined the RAF and served in England and France till 1943, when he was shot down after bombing his target and taken prisoner of war. It was this action which won him the Victoria Cross. In 1946 after his release at the end of the war, Group Captain Trent was transferred to the RNZAF and worked in Air Department on a selection board for the RAF till 1947. He returned to the RAF, joined Transport Command, then Flying Training Command and, after completing the Flying College Course in 1955, back to Bomber Command. In 1962, after three years as Station Commander at Wittering, Peterborough, Group Captain Trent was posted to the British Defence Staff in Washington, D.C. Shortly after this he was appointed aide-de-camp to Her Majesty the Queen.

Washbourn, Rear Admiral Richard Everley, C.B., D.S.O., O.B.E.

(1910– ).

Chief of Naval Staff, New Zealand.

Richard Everley Washbourn was born at Nelson on 14 February 1910. He was educated at Nelson College and entered the RN by special entry from New Zealand in 1927. After spending eight years aboard HMS Erebus, HMS London, and HMS Diomede, he spent 1936–37 specialising in gunnery. In 1938 he was posted to HMS Excellent and in 1939 to HMS Achilles. For his part in the engagement at the River Plate Rear Admiral Washbourn won the D.S.O. After three years' service on Achilles he transferred to HMS Anson. The final two years of the war he spent at the Admiralty Gunnery Establishment. In 1950 he became Executive Officer on HMNZS Bellona for two years, Commander Superintendent of HMNZ Dockyard, Devonport, and Deputy Director of Naval Ordnance, 1951–52. After a year in command of HMS Manxman he was appointed Chief Staff Officer to Flag Officer (Flotillas) in the Mediterranean, 1954–55. He next spent two years as Director of Naval Ordnance and a year in command of HMS Tiger before taking up the position of Director-General of Weapons for the Admiralty (1960–62). Since 1963 he has been Chief of Naval Staff, Wellington, New Zealand.

2. Art

Visual Arts

A number of New Zealanders are making unique and valuable contributions to cultural activities in various fields of visual art in Great Britain. Some of these names are known widely - Low and Waite as cartoonists; Douglas Glass, portrait photographer for the Sunday Times; John Hutton, glass engraver; and Felix Kelly, artist. Others are well known and recognised with no less appreciation in their own particular spheres. F. H. Coventry, an artist-designer in the commercial field, has received many important commissions, including murals for the Plymouth City Council. Arthur Thompson worked as a sketch artist for such films as Lawrence of Arabia and Road to Hong Kong. An art instructor at the Hornsey School of Art, Heber Thompson, who was educated in Dunedin, has many fine paintings and etchings to his credit. James Macpherson, born in Kaitaia, is a distinguished sculptor who now lives in London where he has worked with the British sculptor, John Sheaping. Marian Kratochwill (better known as Kathleen Browne, formerly art mistress at Auckland Diocesan High School and Marsden School) is an art tutor whose work has been shown by most British art societies, including the Royal Academy. Kenneth Clark, who remained in England to study fine arts and ceramics after active service in the Second World War, is now a designer and ceramist in London. He assisted in designing the interior decor of the ships Empress of Canada and Aramoana and is engaged on projects for architects, local authorities, and private clients.

Hutton, John Campbell

(1906– ).

Artist and glass engraver.

John Hutton was born at Clyde, on 8 August 1906. He was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School and was at one time a law student at Victoria University College. His real interest, however, lay in art and he went to England in 1936 to become an artist. During the Second World War he served as a camouflage officer in the British forces in Egypt, Palestine, Cyprus, and the European campaign, and was mentioned in dispatches three times. At one time he was chairman of the Society of Mural Painters; but he has little time to spare for representational painting in oils and water colours now that he has made such a reputation as a glass engraver. Some of his works of art include murals for the Festival of Britain, 1951, the Dunkirk War Memorial engraved glass window in France, the Guildford Cathedral west doors, a glass screen for the civic centre in Plymouth, and the 90 large plate-glass panels which form the great west screen of the new Coventry Cathedral. He also engraved the glass panels for the Shakespeare Centre at Stratford-on-Avon.

Kelly, Felix Runcie

(1914– ).

Artist and stage painter.

Felix Kelly was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 3 February 1914 and was educated at Kings College, Auckland. He left New Zealand for London in 1935 and, apart from giving several one-man exhibitions in London, Washington, New York, and South Carolina, he has had a considerable amount of his work reproduced. He painted stage sets for A Day by the Sea (Haymarket Theatre Royal), the opera Nelson (Sadlers Wells), The Last Joke (Phoenix Theatre), and The Merchant of Venice (Old Vic).

Morgan, Terence

( – ).

Film and theatre designer.

Terence Morgan was born at Wellington, New Zealand, and was educated at New Plymouth High School and studied art at Elam School of Art, Auckland. He left New Zealand for England in 1936 and, apart from several years on the stage in the United States and service with the RAF in the Second World War, has lived in London since then. In England he was taught by several Russian artists who have had a considerable influence on his designing. Morgan has for many years been engaged in film and theatre designing and in 1962 was awarded the First Moscow Medallion for “humanism in the art of the cinema”. He has not only worked on set designing but also on directing, make up, and costume designing.

Cartoonists

The most famous of New Zealand cartoonists is David Low (1891–1963), who won for himself in London a world reputation for his brilliant cartoons on political and international affairs, especially in the 1930s. Two other New Zealanders have now come to the fore as cartoonists. W. E. Waite (1927– ) was born at Mokau, Taranaki, and varied his teaching at Urenui by making occasional contributions to various newspapers. In 1948 he joined the staff of the Otago Daily Times, Dunedin, as a full-time cartoonist and soon showed such talent that in 1951 he went to the Daily Sketch, London. He has recently gained several important awards and is a regular contributor to Punch and other leading journals. In 1965 he joined the Sun newspaper as political cartoonist.

Neville Maurice Colvin (1918– ) was born at Dunedin, where he trained as a teacher. He gained valuable experience as a cartoonist in the New Zealand forces newspaper in the Middle East, the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces Times. After the war he worked for the Evening Post, Wellington, developing a style which stood him in good stead when he later transferred to London.

Photography

Glass, Alfred George Douglas

(1901– ).

Photographer and Eccentric.

Douglas Glass was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 6 May 1901, and has led a colourful life — cow hand, sheep shearer, drover, salesman, journalist on a Dutch newspaper, lecturer in Europe, and the chief official photographer to UNRRA in Germany. He was a student at the Central School of Arts, London, but found that photography gave him a more effective visual tool than drawing so far as his interest in people is concerned. He has gained a considerable reputation from his portrait photographs, published in the Sunday Times, of eminent and interesting people in all walks of life.

3. Ballet

Although many New Zealanders have found employment for varying periods of time with the Royal Ballet Co. and Sadlers Wells Ballet, perhaps those who achieved greatest recognition are Bryan Ashbridge, Alexander Grant, and Rowena Jackson, who has returned to New Zealand to live.

Bryan Ashbridge was born at Wellington in 1926 and educated at Auckland Grammar School, where he was prominent in various forms of sport. When he was 18 he went to London to continue his ballet studies, won the Adeline Genee Gold Medal, and was a soloist in the film Red Shoes. In 1948 he joined Sadlers Wells Ballet and in 1952 became a soloist. Five years later he became a principal male dancer and as such has danced all the male leads in full-length classical ballets and has partnered prima ballerinas, such as Margot Fonteyn, Alicia Markova, and Beryl Gray. Bryan Ashbridge has toured in every major country of the world and has been guest artist with many national ballet companies — Rumanian, Swedish, Finnish — and Munich Opera Ballet.

Alexander Grant, now in his early thirties, was also born at Wellington and attended Wellington College. He won a Royal Academy dancing scholarship in 1944 to study in London. He arrived there in 1946 and was promoted from the junior to the senior company at Sadler's Wells within two or three months. His position, principal male dancer in the Royal Ballet Co., has taken him, like Bryan Ashbridge, all over the world in many different roles and with many famous ballerinas. In June 1965 he was awarded the C.B.E.

4. Business and Commerce

Many New Zealanders find their niches in the United Kingdom business world. The following are some of the important living representatives of this group.

Arthur, Frederick Stanley

(1901– ).

Company director.

Frederick Arthur was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 3 February 1901 and was educated at Otago Boys' High School and at the University of Otago. In 1919 he joined the staff of Dalgety and Co., in Dunedin, and became manager of the wool department, a position he held till 1937. In that year he was New Zealand representative on the International Wool Secretariat in London. Subsequently he held the position of Secretary of Wool Control in the British Ministry of Supply from 1940 to 1945. In 1946 he was appointed general manager of United Kingdom Dominion Wool Disposals Ltd., and in 1951 he took up his present positions, London agent for the New Zealand Wool Commission, and chairman of directors of F. S. Arthur and Co. Ltd.

Bunting, Angus

(1896– ).

Financier.

Angus Bunting was born at Maxwelton, near Wanganui, New Zealand, on 8 July 1896 and was educated at Hamilton High School. He spent most of his early business life in Auckland in real estate, building, and insurance. In 1930 he commenced business in London as the Bunting Construction Co. Ltd. and carried out many large contracts and development schemes. He sold the original company in 1960 but retained the Angus Bunting Investment Co. and subsidiaries which operate as industrial bankers and property investors and of which he is chairman of directors.

Butler, John Manton

(1909– ).

Managing director.

John Butler was born at Invercargill, New Zealand, on 9 October 1909 and was educated at the University of Otago from which he graduated M.Sc. after gaining a senior scholarship in physics. He was president of the Students' Union and the first graduate to take a seat on the University Council. In 1935 he commenced employment with the Shell Co. in Wellington and subsequently served in various branches of this group in New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom till 1957, when he resigned from the position of general marketing manager of the Shell Chemical Co. to take up his present appointment as managing director of Lewis Berger (Great Britain) Ltd. He is also a director of several other Lewis Berger companies.

Dickinson, James Collett

(1898– )

Consulting engineer.

James Dickinson was born at Ponsonby, Auckland, on 19 March 1898. He was the first University Entrance scholar from Auckland Grammar School and studied civil engineering at Auckland and Canterbury University Colleges, where he graduated B.E. and won a travelling scholarship in engineering. He served in the forces towards the end of the First World War and in the early twenties commenced employment with Kirk and Randall, contractors. In 1926 he was associated with the first of many well-known engineering projects he has worked on, the Sydney and Newcastle Bridges. For the next 10 years he worked with Sir John Jackson at Nag Hammadi Barrage in Egypt, and the Singapore Naval Base. He then spent two years with the Air Ministry in Singapore before joining Balfour Beatty in Scottish hydro-electric schemes and then returned to Balfour Beatty in London, Abadan, and elsewhere till 1948 in a number of Middle East countries. In 1952 he became a partner of Messrs Preece, Cardew, and Rider, and now specialises in hydro-electric development.

Frethey, Albert Roy

(1902– ).

Bank manager.

Albert Frethey was born at Midhirst, near Stratford, New Zealand, on 11 July 1902 and attended Stratford District High School. He trained as a professional accountant and also (1924) gained a diploma in banking. He has occupied numerous positions with the Bank of New Zealand in New Zealand, Australia, and London. At present he is manager of the London office. He is past president of the New Zealand Society and a member of the committee of the London New Zealand Cricket Club.

Harston, Sir Ernest Sirdefield, C.B.E.

(1891– ).

Solicitor.

Sir Ernest Harston was born at Thames, New Zealand, on 21 August 1891 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School, Napier Boys' High School, St John's College, and Auckland University College. He served in the New Zealand forces in the First World War in Egypt, Gallipoli, and France and was mentioned in dispatches. Subsequently he was attached to Defence Headquarters in Wellington. In 1918 he was admitted as a solicitor in New Zealand and, in 1935, in England. From 1926 to 1930 he was a member of the Secretariat of the League of Nations and from 1944 to 1950 was a member of the Marylebone Borough Council. In 1961 he became chairman of the British Empire Service League after being honorary secretary since 1942. He was created O.B.E. in 1947, C.B.E. in 1953, and Knight Bachelor in 1958. He is a partner in a London legal firm.

Haslam, Eric Percival

(1912– ).

Bank advisor.

Eric Haslam was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 11 January 1912 and attended Timaru Boys' High School and Auckland University College, where he was a University national scholar in 1930 and won a double senior scholarship in 1933. In 1934 he was a Rhodes scholar elect, and the following year went to Balliol College, Oxford, where he qualified M.A. and B.Litt. His first appointment was as secretary to the Lever-hulme Mission to West Africa in 1939. For the next six years he was an economist for the Commonwealth Bank of Australia in London and part-time economic assistant to the Australian High Commissioner for two of those years. From 1945 to 1948 he was transferred to the bank's head office in Sydney. In 1948 he joined the advisory staff of the Bank of England and is at present in the Asian affairs section.

Lund, Reginald Gustav, M.B.E.

(1909– ).

International Wool Secretariat.

Reginald Lund was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 28 January 1909 and was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School. He started his career in journalism as a reporter for the Christchurch Sun in 1927. In 1930 he joined the Christchurch Press and was parliamentary correspondent for that newspaper and the Otago Daily Times, as well as chief of staff for the Press, till 1936. From 1936 to 1946 he was editor of the Southland Times, except for his period of service during the Second World War as a Flying Officer with the RNZAF in the South Pacific. In 1947 he was appointed New Zealand representative on the International Wool Secretariat and was chairman from 1950 to 1952 and from 1959 to 1961. His current position is regional director Europe for the International Wool Secretariat. He has also been a member of the Board of Directors of the Wool Bureau, New York, 1950–60, and chairman of the Executive Committee of the Board. R. G. Lund was awarded the M.B.E. in 1946.

McNeil, Hector

(1904– ).

Company director.

Hector McNeil was born at Invercargill, New Zealand, on 20 July 1904 and was educated at Christchurch. He graduated bachelor of engineering from Canterbury University College and worked for the Public Works Department in New Zealand for two years. In 1929 he went to Australia and was on the staff of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria for two years. In 1931 he was appointed to the staff of Babcock and Wilcox Ltd., London, of which he is now managing director. He is also director of the German, French, Spanish, Australian, Canadian, Mexican, Japanese, and New Zealand Associated Babcock and Wilcox Companies, and a director of the National Bank of New Zealand. Other companies of which he is a director are: English Electric, Babcock and Wilcox, and Taylor Woodrow Atomic Power Construction Co. Ltd. He is a member of the Institutions of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and was president of the Institute of Fuel, 1957–58.

Martin, Donald Lewis Maunsell

(1916– ).

British representative of the New Zealand Meat Producers Board.

Donald Martin was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 19 June 1916 and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, and Kings College, Auckland. He qualified first as an accountant, A.R.A.N.Z., and graduated bachelor of commerce from Auckland University College in 1939. From 1940 to 1945 he served as a pilot in the RNZAF. Subsequently he completed a law degree at Victoria University College in 1948. At present Donald Martin is British representative of the New Zealand Meat Producers Board in London. He is also a member of the Executive Committee of the British Commonwealth Producers Organisation in London and an Executive Committee member of the New Zealand Society.

Nan Kivell, Rex de Charembac

(1899– ).

Company director.

Rex Nan Kivell was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, in 1899 and was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School. At the age of 15 he joined the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, but after the Battle of Messines he was withdrawn because of his age. He then went to the Royal College of Science, London, and later became Marshal to the Judges of the High Court. In 1923 he founded the Redfern Gallery to exhibit impressionist French paintings and contemporary paintings by French and English artists. He gradually amassed a large collection of early Australasian and South Seas pictures, books, manuscripts and engravings, which is now in the Commonwealth National Library in Canberra. For his archaeological work on the La Fene occupation of Great Britain and the excavation of Romano-British sites in Wiltshire, he was decorated by King Christian of Denmark with the Order of Dannebrog. The objects found with these excavations are now in the Devizes Museum. During 1953–54 the Nan Kivell Collection of early New Zealand water colours and drawings was displayed throughout New Zealand. In 1952 Nan Kivell presented to the National Gallery, Wellington, 180 contemporary British wood engravings and, in 1953, he added a further 400 contemporary British prints, mostly lithographs, and made similar gifts to the art galleries at Auckland, Christchurch, and Dunedin.

Oram, Matthew Henry

(1915– )

Actuary and company director.

Matthew Oram was born at Palmerston North, New Zealand, on 12 November 1915, the son of Sir Matthew Henry Oram, a former Speaker of the House of Representatives. He was educated at Palmerston North Boys' High School and Waitaki Boys' High School. At Victoria University College he graduated M.A. in 1936, and in 1949 he became a fellow of the Institute of Actuaries. During the Second World War he was commissioned in the Royal Artillery and was demobilised with the rank of major in 1946. He has been actively associated with the territorial service, particularly with the Honourable Artillery Company, for which he was a member of the Court of Assistants. Since 1958 he has been on the Management Committee of London House, Dominion Students Hall Trust, and, from 1959, treasurer for the Royal Commonwealth Society. He has published jointly with W. Thomas and C. E. BeebyEntrance to the University.

He is a liveryman of the Merchant Taylors Company and a churchwarden of the St. Mary-le-Bow group of churches. In July 1963 he was elected a common councilman for the Corporation of London.

Platt, James Westlake

(1896– ).

Company director.

J. W. Platt was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College before going on active service in the First World War with the New Zealand Division in 1917. He was demobilised as second lieutenant and proceeded to Balliol College, Oxford, with a New Zealand Expeditionary Force scholarship. In 1919 he was an exhibitioner at Balliol, and after completing his M.A. he joined the Royal Dutch — Shell Group. He served till 1938 in China, and during the Second World War was general manager of Shell-Mex Argentina Ltd. From 1945 to 1949 he was managing director of the Eagle Oil and Shipping Co. Ltd. Since 1949 he has been director of the “Shell” Transport and Trading Co., a managing director of the Royal Dutch — Shell Group (till 1957), and director of the Shell Petroleum Co. Ltd. and Bataafse Petroleum Mij. N.V. For many years he has been associated with the Executive Committee of the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Councils as chairman and vice-chairman and has acted as a member of the Drogheda Committee on British Information Services Overseas, chairman of the 1959 Salaries Commission for the Hong Kong Government, and chairman of the United Kingdom Advisory Council on Education for Management. He has also been member and chairman of a European productivity agency to survey the development of management studies in Europe.

Ross, Alexander

(1907– ).

Banker and company director.

Alexander Ross was born at Herekino, North Auckland, New Zealand, on 2 September 1907 and was educated at Mount Albert Grammar School and Auckland University College. He started his banking career with the National Bank of New Zealand and subsequently joined the Reserve Bank of New Zealand at its foundation, becoming Deputy Governor in 1948. He represented New Zealand on numerous occasions overseas, including the sterling area conference in Australia in 1954. He joined the main board of United Dominions Trust in London in 1955 and has since had special responsibilities for the overseas companies of this group. Alexander Ross has always been closely associated with New Zealand sport and represented New Zealand as an oarsman in the Empire Games at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1930. He was also manager of the New Zealand team at the Empire Games in Vancouver in 1954. Since July 1962 he has been vice-chairman of the United Dominions Trust Ltd. in London.

Sims, Sir Arthur

(1877– ).

Industrialist.

Sir Arthur Sims was born on 27 July 1877 and educated at Christchurch Boys' High School. As a pupil at Christchurch Boys' High School he decided not to study immediately at university but to go out into the commercial field first. Subsequently in 1902, he graduated Master of Arts from Canterbury University College. In business he has been associated in a number of ventures with Arthur Cooper, with whom he really began his business career in 1905. In 1910 they established the London Produce Co., and after the First World War they entered the wool trade at Bradford. Sir Arthur's interests were extended to include timber investments in New Zealand, land development in Rhodesia and Canada, and the production of gelatine. Among some of his well-known benefactions are the endowment of the Lord Rutherford Memorial Scholarship at Canterbury University College, the presentation to New Zealand of its first supply of radium, the provision of a mobile surgical unit for the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force, the endowment of the Sims Empire Scholarship to promote the study of physics, chemistry, medicine, and mathematics at Canterbury University College, and the endowment of the Commonwealth Travelling Professorship in medicine. In 1950 Sir Arthur was created knight bachelor for his services to trade and to medicine. He has had conferred on him numerous honorary degrees, including F.R.C.S., F.R.C.O.G., F.R.A.C.S., F.R.A.C.P., F.R.C.P., F.R.C.S., LL.D. He is also an honorary medalist of the Royal College of Surgeons. As a young man he was a New Zealand cricket representative, and he still retains a keen interest in the game.

Uren, Reginald Harold

(1906– ).

Architect.

Reginald Uren was born at Belfast, near Christchurch, on 5 March 1906, and was educated at Hutt Valley High School, and qualified as an architect in New Zealand in 1929. He continued his studies at London University and qualified A.R.I.B.A. in 1931. Two years later he won an open architectural competition for the Hornsey Town Hall. Since then he has been in private practice designing department stores and public, domestic, commercial, and school buildings. Reginald Uren has won a number of medals for his work and has been made a freeman of the City of London and a member of the Court of the Tylers and Bricklayers Co. His public service includes four years war service during the Second World War and committee work on various architectural organisations; since 1946 he has represented the New Zealand Institute of Architects on the Council at the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Ward, Basil Robert

(1902– ).

Architect.

Basil Robert Ward was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 22 July 1902 and was educated at Napier Boys' High School. Prior to studying architecture overseas he served as a pupil of the late Louis Hay, F.N.Z.I.A. Later he went to London University Atalier of Architecture and the British School at Rome where he won second prize in the Rome Scholarship in 1927. Between 1929 and 1931 he carried out works for the Government of Burma; he then joined an English firm to undertake outstanding pioneer work in contemporary design. For the first four years of the Second World War he was a technical officer in the Research and Experiments Department of the Ministry of Home Security. Subsequently he served as lieutenant-commander in Naval Intelligence with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (Special Branch). From 1946 to 1952 he was professor of architecture and from 1953 to 1956 first Lethaby professor of architecture at the Royal College of Art (of which he is an honorary fellow). At the same time he has carried on his professional work in the firm of Murray, Ward, and Partners.

Watt, Group Captain George Ernest, C.B.E., A.F.C.

(1908– ).

General manager of Rolls Royce test establishment.

George Ernest Watt was born at Frankton, New Zealand, on 10 February 1908 and was educated at Auckland and Canterbury University Colleges, where he took a degree in engineering. He continued his studies at the Imperial College and joined the New Zealand Territorial Air Force in 1927. Six years later he joined the RAF with a permanent commission and served with No. 18 Squadron till 1936. For the next two years he was with the RAF School of Aeronautical Engineering, then at the Imperial College till war broke out. At this stage he became an experimental test pilot at Farnborough. In 1941 he was appointed Maintenance Liaison Officer in the Middle East and from 1942 to 1944 was Deputy Director of Special Projects. His next post was as Deputy Director of Turbine Engines, till 1947, when he spent three years with the RNZAF as Director of Technical Services. Group Captain Watt was Command Engineer Officer of Fighter Command from 1950 to 1953 and Assistant Commandant of the RAF Technical College at Henlow for a year before his retirement. Since then he has been on the staff of Rolls Royce Ltd., where he is general manager of the test establishment at Sinfin, Derby. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

Webster, Kenneth Athol

(1906– ).

Art dealer and collector.

Kenneth Webster was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 17 December 1906. He was educated at Wellington College and then spent two years in clerical work before taking up a farm in the King Country. In 1936 he went to London, where he was engaged in factory work until the outbreak of war. His interest in art developed in 1945 after his period of service with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. At that time he began his collection of Maori antiquities which is now the largest private collection of its kind in the world. More recently he is building up a collection of early New Zealand and Pacific books, pictures, and manuscripts.

5. Church

Bellhouse, The Rev. Geoffrey Turner

(1899– ).

Presbyterian minister.

Geoffrey Turner Bellhouse was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 21 July 1899 and was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School. He graduated master of arts at Auckland University College and began study for the ministry at Knox College, Dunedin. He went to Edinburgh University to complete the course, graduating bachelor of divinity. He was ordained in 1926 at Regent Square Presbyterian Church, Glasgow, since when he has been at St. Andrew's, Eastbourne. He served a term as moderator of the Presbyterian Church of England, 1958–59, and has been special preacher on many occasions both in the United Kingdom and in the United States. The Rev. Bellhouse has done a considerable amount of broadcasting and published a number of books, including Thinking it Out, Immortal Longings and These are Thy Wonders.

Carrington, The Most Rev. Philip

(1892– ).

Formerly Anglican archbishop of Quebec and acting metropolitan of the Province of Canada.

Philip Carrington was born at Lichfield, England, on 6 July 1892. He was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, New Zealand, and at Canterbury University College, where he graduated master of arts. He went to Selwyn College, Cambridge, for post-graduate study and holds a Cambridge M.A., and subsequently gained a doctorate of literature from the University of New Zealand. His contributions to church and literary and social work have been recognised by a number of universities which have conferred honorary degrees on him — Lennoxville, Quebec; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Durham; Laval, Quebec; Trinity College, Toronto. Between 1918 and 1923, as curate of St. Luke's, Christchurch, and vicar of Lincoln, Canterbury, he developed the Soldiers of the Cross Scheme for children and was boy scout commissioner for the Canterbury region. The next four years he was warden at St. Barnabas' Theological College, Adelaide. In 1927 he took a position as dean of divinity at Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec, and in 1935 he became bishop of Quebec. He was archbishop of Quebec from 1944 till 1960, when he retired. In 1959 he was acting primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. Among his numerous publications are The Boy Scout's Camp Book, Christian Apologetics in the Second Century, The Sign of the Faith, The Primitive Christian Catechism, Church History for Canadians, The Early Church, and The Meaning of the Revelation.

Gerard, Right Rev. George Vincent, M.C., C.B.E.

(1898– ).

Assistant bishop of Sheffield.

George Vincent Gerard was born at Fendalton, Christchurch, New Zealand, on 24 November 1898 and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, from 1913 to 1916. He joined the Inns of Court Officers' Training Corps the following year and was a Lieutenant in the Buffs in 1918, during which service he was awarded the Military Cross. From 1919 to 1921 he studied at Brasenose College, Oxford, for the degree of bachelor of arts. He was ordained a deacon in 1922 and a priest in 1923. During the period 1922–26 he was curate of Timaru and in 1925 he gained his master of arts degree. He returned to England as curate of St. Saviour's, Croydon, 1927–28, and St. Margaret's, Barking, 1928–29. Between 1929 and 1938 he spent as vicar two or three years each in Pahiatua, Petone, and Auckland, when he became bishop of Waiapu. He gave service again in the Second World War, first as Senior Chaplain to the New Zealand Forces, 1940–41, when he was taken prisoner of war, and next as Senior New Zealand Chaplain for the South Pacific, 1944, after he had been repatriated. In 1945 he served on a hospital ship before taking up his appointment as vicar and rural dean of Rotherham, Yorkshire, which he held till 1960. He has been honorary canon and assistant bishop of Sheffield since 1947, and in 1960 became residentiary canon of Sheffield Cathedral.

Sullivan, The Venerable Martin Gloster

(1910– ).

Archdeacon of London.

Martin Gloster Sullivan was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 30 March 1910. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School, St. John's (Theological) College, and Auckland University College, where he obtained his M.A. After taking Holy Orders he was appointed vicar of Te Awamutu (1936–46) and, concurrently, acted as examining chaplain to the bishop of Waikato. During 1945–46 he served on the staff of St. Martins-in-Fields, London, but returned to New Zealand, where he spent the next three years as chaplain to the Student Christian movement in Wellington, and from 1950 to 1958 he was principal of College House, Canterbury University. He was dean of Christchurch (1951–62) and vicar-general of the diocese (1952–62). In the latter year he become rector of St. Mary's, Bryanston Square, London. He became Archdeacon of London and a canon of St. paul's Catherdral in 1963. Archdeacon Sullivan has published numerous books and tracts.

6. Colonial Service

Many New Zealanders have found careers in the British Colonial Service. The following selection has been compiled from the Colonial Office List, 1962. New Zealanders serving in countries which have recently attained independence have been placed with the expatriates in their respective countries.

Allan, Colin Hamilton, O.B.E.

(1921– ).

Lands Commissioner, New Hebrides.

Colin Allan was born in 1921 and was educated at Hamilton High School, Canterbury University College, and Cambridge University. From 1942 to 1944 he served with the armed forces. He went to the British Solomon Islands Protectorate as a cadet the following year and was Administrative Officer in 1949. From 1956 to 1958 he was seconded to the Western Pacific High Commission as Lands Commissioner, since when he has been in the New Hebrides.

Andersen, Valdemar Jens, O.B.E.

(1919– ).

Resident Commissioner, Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony.

Valdemar Andersen was born at Palmerston North, New Zealand, on 21 March 1919, was educated at Napier Boys' High School and Auckland University College, and was appointed as a cadet in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate. In 1955 he became Senior Assistant Secretary (Native Affairs) for the Western Pacific High Commission and, three years later, Secretary for Protectorate Affairs. Since 1962 he has been Resident Commissioner for the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony. He served in the armed forces from 1940 to 1946.

Andrew, Michael Arthur Newman, M.C.

(1919– ).

Administrative Officer, British Solomon Islands Protectorate.

Michael Andrew was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 19 October 1919 and was educated at Waitaki Boys' High School and the University of Otago. After a period of military service (1939–45) he went as a cadet to Palestine. Two years later he was transferred to Northern Rhodesia, where he became District Officer, 1949. In 1956 he was appointed Administrative Officer for the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony and, in 1957, for the British Solomon Islands Protectorate.

Bain, Kenneth Ross

(1923– ).

Controller (Organisation and Establishment), Fiji.

Kenneth Bain was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 12 November 1923. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College and served in the armed services from 1941 to 1943. In 1946 he was appointed Administrative Officer in Palestine and in 1948 transferred to Fiji. He spent from 1953 to 1956 as a Secretary to the Government of Tonga, and, 1958–62, was Executive Secretary to the Fiji Housing Authority. He has held his present position since 1962.

Barnes, David John

(1917– ).

Commissioner of Inland Revenue, Fiji.

David Barnes was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 24 April 1917 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Wellington College. In 1945 he joined the Fiji Government Service as a clerk, and later became a Senior Assessor. Since 1957 he has been Commissioner of Inland Revenue in Fiji.

Black, Keith Hilliard

(1920– ).

Principal Medical Officer, Hong Kong.

Keith Black was born in 1920. He was educated at Auckland University College and the University of Otago and saw military service from 1941 to 1946. In 1943 he was Medical Officer in Fiji. In 1954 he was posted to Hong Kong, where in 1960 he was appointed Principal Medical and Health Officer. He holds degrees of M.B., Ch.B. and at Edinburgh he gained a DPH.

Blackie, William John

(1903– ).

Director of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry, Hong Kong.

William Blackie was born at Caversham, Dunedin, New Zealand, on 8 May 1903. After studying at Victoria University College and the University of Otago he undertook post-graduate study at Yale. He was appointed to the Colonial Service in 1929 and in 1939 became Senior Chemist at Fiji. In 1947 he became Deputy Director of Agriculture there, but was posted to Hong Kong, from 1953 to 1961, as Director of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry.

Charlton, Philip Lewis Raymond

(1912– ).

Senior Government Chemist, Fiji.

Philip Charlton was born in 1912. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and at Auckland University College. In 1936 he became Assistant to the Government Chemist in Fiji and, two years later, became Chemist. Except for five years' war service, he held this position until 1961, when his designation was changed to Senior Chemist.

Forsyth, Hector William

(1910– ).

Deputy Director of Public Works, Hong Kong.

Hector Forsyth was born at Te Kuiti, New Zealand, on 26 May 1910. He was a pupil of Auckland Grammar School and studied engineering at Canterbury University College. In 1934 he was appointed temporary Road Engineer in Fiji and became Assistant Engineer five years later. In 1940 he was transferred to Hongh Kong. He served in the armed services there, but was interned by the Japanese. After the war he returned to Hong Kong, where he has been, successively, Chief Engineer (1950), Assistant Director of Public Works (1955), and Deputy Director (1958–61). In addition to this post he is also on the Harbour Ferry Services Committee and the Town Planning Board.

Gregg, Bertrand Lovell

(1905– ).

Registrar-General, Fiji.

Bertrand Gregg was born at Ponsonby, Auckland, New Zealand, on 19 September 1905 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College. He has served in Fiji since 1929, when he was appointed to a clerkship in the Registrar-General's Department. In 1938 he became Legal Draftsman, Deputy Registrar-General, and Registrar of the Fiji Supreme Court. Since 1950 he has been Registrar-General and Registrar of Titles.

Grey, Sir Ralph Francis Alnwick, G.C.M.G., K.C.V.O., O.B.E.

(1910– ).

Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Bahamas.

Sir Ralph Grey was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 15 April 1910 and attended Wellington College before studying law at Auckland University College, where he graduated LL.B. in 1932. He was Judge's Associate at the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal in Wellington from 1932 to 1936, when he left to take a colonial administrative course at Pembroke College, Cambridge. In 1937 he was appointed Administrative Officer in Nigeria and rose to be Secretary to the Governor-General and Council of Ministers in 1954 and Chief Secretary to the Federation of Nigeria in 1955. The title of this office was changed to Deputy Governor-General in 1957. In 1959 Sir Ralph was appointed Governor and Commander-in-Chief of British Guiana. In 1964, at the end of his term, he was appointed Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Bahamas.

Heenan, Maurice

(1912– ).

Attorney-General, Hong Kong.

Maurice Heenan was born at Wyndham, New Zealand, on 8 October 1912. He was a student at Ashburton High School and qualified as a barrister and solicitor from Canterbury University College. Later he attended the Military Staff College at Camberwell and served in the armed forces from 1940 to 1946, being mentioned in dispatches. In 1946 he was appointed Crown Counsel in Palestine for two years. From 1948 he held a similar position in Hong Kong for four years, when he was promoted to Senior Crown Counsel. From 1959 he has been Principal Crown Counsel in Hong Kong. In 1961 he was appointed Solicitor-General and Attorney-General for the Colony.

Horrill, Rowland Finnemore Scott

(1913– ).

Government Printer, Aden.

Rowland Horrill was born at Ashburton, New Zealand, on 8 February 1913. He was educated at Ashburton Technical College and gave military service for four years in the Second World War. In 1947 he was appointed Superintendent of the Government Press in Fiji, a position he held for the next 12 years. Since 1959 he has been Government Printer at Aden.

Lamont, Norman

(1912– ).

Deputy Director of Agriculture, Fiji

Norman Lamont was born at Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand, on 31 August 1912. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and gained his M.Agr.Sc. degree in 1935. After some years service with the Department of Agriculture in New Zealand he was appointed Agricultural Officer in Fiji in 1949. By 1956 he had risen to his present position, Deputy Director of Agriculture.

Lewis, Ernest Gordon, O.B.E., M.B.E. (Mil.)

(1918– ).

Permanent Secretary, Turks and Caicos Islands.

Ernest Lewis was born in 1918. He was educated at Otago Boys' High School and at the University of Otago. After serving in the armed forces from 1939 to 1946 he joined the Colonial Service. His first appointment was as a cadet in Nigeria. When he became an Administrative Officer in 1955 he was seconded for three years as Commissioner of the Turks and Caicos Islands. From 1960 he has been Permanent Secretary.

McAlpine, Hector George Robert, O.B.E., M.V.O.

(1909– ).

Administrative Officer, Fiji.

Hector McAlpine was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 21 June 1909. He attended Otago Boys' High School and graduated from the University of Otago. In 1938 he became an Administrative Officer in Fiji. He was awarded M.V.O. in 1953 and O.B.E. in 1961.

McDonald, William Hector, M.B.E.

(1912– ).

Deputy Director of Medical Services, Fiji.

William McDonald was born in New Zealand in 1912. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and at London University where he graduated in medicine. From 1940 to 1946 he served with the RAMC, when he was appointed Medical Officer in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate. In 1952 he became Senior Medical Officer there, but in 1955 was posted to Fiji. From 1957 to 1962 he was Deputy Director of Medical Services.

Marsack, Wing Commander Alfred Naumai Hardwicke, M.B.E.

(1906– ).

Director of Civil Aviation, Aden.

Alfred Marsack was born at Auckland on 6 October 1906 and was educated at Cranbrook and Kings College, Auckland, New Zealand. From 1930 to 1944 he served in the RAF, attaining the rank of Wing Commander and being mentioned in dispatches. He was Middle East Director of the BBC (Cairo) for the next two years, when he became Public Relations Officer in Aden. From 1947 to 1949 he served in Hong Kong and, in the latter year, returned to Aden Protectorate as a Political Officer. From 1952 to 1962 he was Director of Civil Aviation.

Milliken, Morris

(1923– ).

Federal Statistician, Trinidad.

Morris Milliken was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 1 February 1923 and was a pupil at Auckland Grammar School before attending Massey Agricultural College, where he graduated M.Agr.Sc. From 1941 to 1944 he served with the armed forces. He spent from 1950 to 1952 in Northern Rhodesia and from 1954 to 1958 with the Ministry of Agriculture, Fish, and Food, in London. Next followed a year as Agricultural Economist in the West Indies. Since 1959 he has been Federal Statistician.

Rankine, Sir John Dalzell, K.C.M.G., K.C.V.O., Brilliant Star of Zanzibar First Class

(1907– ).

Former Governor of Western Nigeria.

Sir John Rankine was born in Fiji on 8 June 1907, the son of Sir Richard Rankine, K.C.M.G., of the Colonial Service, and Hilda Gertrude Akerman, daughter of Joseph Steel Dalzell, of Oamaru, New Zealand. He was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, New Zealand, and Exeter College, Oxford, and was appointed to Uganda in 1931 as a cadet. In 1933 he was Assistant District Commissioner and in 1939 was Assistant Secretary for the East Africa Governors' Conference. Next followed three years in Fiji as Assistant Colonial Secretary, 1942–45, when he was appointed Colonial Secretary in Barbadoes. Sir John was then posted to Kenya as Chief Secretary from 1947 to 1952, after which he spent two years in Zanzibar as British Resident. He was Governor of Western Nigeria from 1954 to 1960.

Regnault, Robert Hume

(1919– ).

Deputy Director of Lands, Fiji.

Robert Regnault was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 21 March 1919. He was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School and at Canterbury University College. From 1940 to 1945 he served in the Air Force. In 1955 he was appointed a surveyor in Fiji and since 1957 he has been Deputy Director of Lands.

Roberts, Richard G.

(1918– ).

Administrative Officer, Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony.

Richard Roberts was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 14 September 1918. He was educated at Auckland University College and saw service with the armed forces during the Second World War. In 1945 he went to the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony as a cadet. He was transferred to the British Solomon Island Protectorate in 1955, but since 1958 he has been an Administrative Officer back in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony.

Robertshaw, Frederic Dewar

(1914– ).

Attorney-General, Somaliland.

Frederic Robertshaw was born at Dannevirke, New Zealand, on 8 August 1914. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and at Auckland University College, where he graduated LL.M. in 1937. From 1939 to 1944 he served in the armed forces and in 1951 was appointed Resident Magistrate in Somaliland. He became Attorney-General in 1956, and transferred to the Somalia Government Service after independence was granted.

Turbott, Ian Graham

(1922– ).

Administrator of Grenada.

Ian Turbott was born at Whangarei, New Zealand, on 9 March 1922. He was educated at Takapuna Grammar School, Auckland University College, and Jesus College, Cambridge. After six years of military service, 1940–46, he accepted an appointment as Administrative Officer in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony in 1947. The following year he was Cooperative Societies Officer and, in 1949, Delegate to the South Pacific Conference. From 1952 to 1954 he was Secretary to the Government and from 1956 to 1958 was seconded to the Colonial Office. Since then he has been Administrator of Antigua in the British West Indies. In 1964 he was appointed to Grenada.

Watts, Ian Edward Main

(1914– ).

Director, Royal Observatory, Hong Kong.

Ian Watts was born in 1914. He was educated at Rongotai College, Wellington, at Canterbury University College, and at the University of Malaya. After four years' service with the Air Force he accepted a position as Meteorological Officer in Malaya, where in 1953 he became Assistant Director of the Malayan Meteorological Service. In 1956 he was appointed to his present position. Ian Watts has published Equatorial Weather, Distribution of Rainfall over Singapore, and New Zealand Weather and Climate (in collaboration).

7. Medicine and Dentistry

Many New Zealanders have practised in Britain as surgeons, physicians, and dentists. Two of the most famous of these are the late Sir Harold Gillies and the late Sir Archibald MacIndoe. The following are some distinguished New Zealanders at present practising in the United Kingdom.

Ashcroft, Dudley Walker

(1904– ).

Ear, nose, and throat surgeon.

Dudley Ashcroft was born at Napier, New Zealand, on 10 December 1904. He was educated at the University of Otago, where he graduated M.B., Ch.B., in 1929. He proceeded to Middlesex Hospital, London, and qualified D.L.O. (R.C.P.S.) in 1933. In 1936 he was admitted as fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. During his career he has been lecturer in otolaryn-gology at the University of London, Bernhard Baron research scholar in otolaryngology at Middlesex Hospital, and Streatfeild scholar (Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons). He served throughout the Second World War as a specialist in otolaryngology with the Royal Army Medical Corps and was mentioned in dispatches. Dudley Ashcroft has published many papers on surgical and experimental physiological subjects in various medical and scientific journals, and is a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and a member of the Council of the British Association of Otolaryngologists. He is senior consultant ear, nose, and throat surgeon at Westminister Hospital and Medical School and at Westminister Children's Hospital, consultant ear, nose, and throat surgeon at Queen Charlotte's Hospital and Chelsea Hospital for Women, and a consulting otolarynologist in private practice.

Barron, John Netterville

(1911– ).

Plastic surgeon.

John Barron was born at Napier, New Zealand, on 23 December 1911. He was educated at the University of Otago and left for postgraduate and specialist study in England in 1937. At present he is specialising in surgical reconstructive work required after surgery for cancer, in surgery associated with congenital abnormalities, and in post-accident reconstruction. He was one of a team of four plastic surgeons, all New Zealanders, who achieved eminence in their field before the Second World War — Sir Archibald McIndoe, Sir Harold Gillies, and Rainsford Mowlem. He was director of rehabilitation at the Vauxhall Motor Works, Luton, for a time, and gave war service in Yugoslavia. At present he is lecturer in plastic surgery at the Post-graduate Medical School, London.

Beresford, Jack Stuart

(1920– ).

Dental surgeon.

J. S. Beresford was born at Auckland on 10 January 1920 and attended Taumarunui District High School and Mount Albert Grammar School before entering the Dental School at the University of Otago. He graduated B.D.S. in 1941 and was the first recipient of the University of New Zealand's travelling scholarship in dental surgery. After qualifying, he served for five years in the Dental Corps of the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force in New Zealand, the South Pacific, and the United Kingdom. His post-graduate work led to his becoming qualified H.D.D. (R.C.S.Ed.) and D.Orth. (R.C.S.Eng.). His present positions, apart from his work as private practitioner, are consultant dental surgeon at the London Hospital and clinical teacher at the University of London.

Britton, Cedric John Charles

(1904– ).

Allergist and haematologist.

Cedric Britton was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 5 November 1904. He attended Wanganui Technical College and Nelson College. After graduating M.B., Ch.B. at the University of Otago in 1928 Britton gained a diploma in public health the following year, and in 1930–31 did postgraduate study as Middlesex Hospital New Zealand scholar. He gained a doctorate in medicine in 1936 and for 10 years was assistant pathologist at Middlesex Hospital. He is co-author of Disorders of the Blood (eighth edition, 1957) and Leitners Bone, Marrow Biopsy (1949). Britton is physician in charge of the Department of Allergy and consultant haemotologist at the Prince of Wales's Hospital and to the Ministry of Pensions at Queen Mary's Hospital, London. He is also consultant pathologist to St. Andrew's Hospital, Finchley Memorial Hospital, Hendon District Hospital, St. Saviour's Hospital, and St. Luke's Hospital. In addition he is bacteriologist and deputy medical officer of health for St. Marylebone Borough Council. Among his other interests he is a member of the Council of the British Medical Association, treasurer of the British Association of Allergists, and on the Barnet Group Hospital Management Committee.

Chapman, Sylvia Gytha de Lancey

Hon. Registrar, College of General Practitioners, London.

Sylvia Chapman, a daughter of Sir Frederick Chapman, was educated at Woodford House School, and graduated M.D. from Otago University. She was always interested in matters of general welfare and was prominent in the activities of the Y.W.C.A., being National President for 10 years from 1929. From 1939 to 1945 she was Chairman of Wellington Refugee Emergency Committee. In 1937 she was the first woman elected to the University Senate of New Zealand, holding the seat till she left New Zealand for Greece in 1946 as director of CORSO Relief Team. Sylvia Chapman was for a term National President of the International Federation of University Women (New Zealand branch). From 1936 to 1946 she was Medical Superintendent of St. Helens Hospital, Wellington, and for the same period was examiner in midwifery for the New Zealand Registration Board. She became Resident Obstetrician of the Dulwich Hospital, London, in 1948. In recent years she has lived in retirement in England, but holds the position of Honorary Registrar of the College of General Practitioners.

Clarkson, Wensley Patrick, M.B.E.

(1911– ).

Plastic surgeon.

Patrick Clarkson was born at Riccarton, New Zealand, on 20 February 1911 and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch, and the Universities of Otago, Edinburgh, and London (Guy's Hospital). He earned a number of awards during his post-graduate study and graduated M.B., B.S. (Lond.). He is also a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. His present positions include senior consulting plastic surgeon, South West Metropolitan Board Plastic Surgery Centre, Basingstoke, and surgeon-in-charge of the Children's Burns Unit and of the Casualty Department, Guy's Hospital; honorary civil consultant plastic surgeon to Queen Alexandra Hospital, Millbank, and to Cambridge Military Hospital. He served for six years in the Second World War with the RAMC, partly at the Harold Gillies Plastic Centre, Basingstoke, but mainly as the Officer Commanding the Maxillo-Facial (and Burns) Unit in North Africa and Italy. After the war he continued to specialise in the treatment of burns and in plastic surgery and was sponsored by the Army to visit the United States in 1951 and 1954 to inspect centres there. In addition he has been a teacher and examiner of surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons. His publications have been concerned chiefly with plastic surgery burns, and hands.

Durward, Archibald

(1902– ).

Professor of anatomy.

Although born in Scotland on 6 April 1902, Archibald Durward was educated at Otago Boys High School and qualified M.B., Ch.B., from the University of Otago in 1925, where he won a medical travelling scholarship. After spending a year as a house surgeon at the Dunedin Public Hospital, in 1927 he became lecturer and senior demonstrator of anatomy and sometime acting professor at the University of Otago till 1931. The previous year he had gained his M.D. with distinction. He was appointed lecturer in anatomy and senior demonstrator at University College, London, from 1931 to 1936, since when he has been professor of anatomy at the University of Leeds. At various times he has acted as examiner for the Universities of New Zealand, London, Cambridge, Dublin, and St. Andrews. He has published various articles on comparative neurology; “The Penpheral Nervous System” in Cunningham's Textbook of Anatomy, ninth edition; and Nascularity and Patterns of Growth in Biology of Hair Growth. Professor Durward is a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He died in Kent on 4 March 1964.

Falconer, Murray Alexander

(1910– ).

Neurosurgeon.

Murray Falconer was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 15 May 1910 and educated at Otago Boys' High School. At the University of Otago he qualified M.B., Ch.B, and M.Ch. During his career he has been a fellow of the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota; Nuffield Dominions Assistant in surgery at Oxford University; major in the Royal Army Medical Corps, 1940–43; and associate professor of neuro-surgery at the University of Otago, 1943 to 1950. During this last period he was also consultant neurosurgeon to the New Zealand armed forces. He became a fellow of the Royal College of surgeons in 1935 and of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in 1944. He also holds visiting and consultant positions at United States hospitals and universities.

At present he is director of Guy's Maudsley Neurosurgical Unit in London and senior neurosurgeon at Guy's, Bethlehem Royal, and Maudsley Hospitals.

Flavell Geoffrey

(1913– ).

Thoracic surgeon.

Geoffrey Flavell was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 23 February 1913 and attended Waitaki and Otago Boys' High Schools. After studying at the University of Otago he went to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, and gained his medical qualification in 1937. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and a member of the Royal College of Physicians. Following appointments at St. Bartholomew's and Brompton Hospitals, he became a Surgeon Specialist in the RAF in 1942. A year later he was appointed Officer Commanding the Surgical Divisions of the RAF General Hospitals in Carthage, Algiers, and Cairo. In 1944 he took over the position of Adviser in Surgery for the RAF Mediterranean and Middle East Command, from which he retired in 1958 with the rank of Wing Commander. His present positions are surgeon to the Department of Thoracic Surgery at London Hospital, consultant thoracic surgeon to the Royal Masonic, Whipps Cross, Wanstead, Oldchurch, St. Margaret's, Harold Wood, and Harts Hospitals, and senior surgeon at Broomfield Hospital, Essex. Apart from his contributions to medical journals, Geoffrey Flavell has published An Introduction to Chest Surgery and Basic Surgery (Thoracic Section).

Foreman, Harold Mason, M.B.E.

(1913– ).

Superintendent, Sully Hospital, Glamorgan.

Harold Foreman was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 1 December 1913 and was educated at Takapuna Grammar School. He qualified M.B., Ch.B., at the University of Otago. where he was a prominent football player, gaining a New Zealand University rugby blue. At the outbreak of the Second World War he enlisted in the New Zealand Medical Corps and was posted to No. 1 New Zealand General Hospital and was taken prisoner of war in Greece in 1941. When he was liberated in Germany at the end of hostilities he was appointed resident medical officer and senior registrar at Brompton Hospital, which post he held till 1951. He was then appointed to his present position, physician-superintendent of Sully Hospital, near Penarth, Glamorganshire. Foreman also lectures in tuberculosis for the Welsh National School of Medicine and has been secretary of the Thoracic Society since 1960. He is a member of the Royal College of Physicians (London).

Forrest, Duncan Mouat

(1922– ).

Paediatric surgeon.

Duncan Forrest was born at Palmerston North, New Zealand, on 19 December 1922. He attended Palmerston North Boys' High School and Wanganui Collegiate School before starting a medical course at the University of Otago. He qualified M.B., Ch.B., in 1947 and, two years later, went to England for post-graduate study. In 1951 he became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and has since specialised in children's surgery. Forrest is a consultant paediatric surgeon for the Westminister Hospital Group, the Children's Hospital, Sydenham, and Queen Mary's Hospital for Children at Carshalton. He is also consultant physician for the New Zealand Migration Office.

Fraser, Thomas Russell Cumming

(1908– ).

Professor of clinical endocrinology.

Russell Fraser was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 25 September 1908. He graduated M.D. from the University of Otago and, a few years later, started post-graduate work in London on the biochemical and clinical aspects of medicine, first at the Middlesex Hospital and then at the Post-graduate Medical School and Maudlsey Hospital. In 1939 he worked as a Rockefeller travelling fellow on endocrine problems. During the Second World War he was engaged in psychiatry, investigating for a time the effects of bombing and the incidence of neurosis in factory workers. After the war he returned to the Post-graduate Medical School to further his research work. This has covered thyroid disease, tests of parathyroid function, insulin tolerance test, tests of pituitary function, the action of growth hormone in man, and its assay in plasma. Since 1957 Fraser has been professor of clinical endocrinology in the Department of Medicine at the Post-graduate Medical School of London, where he was previously lecturer, then reader, in medicine. His publications include Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine, Endocrine Disorders, and, with others, Diseases of Bone in the Parathyroid Gland and Therapeutic Pituitary Ablation.

Green, Anthony

(1908– ).

Radiologist.

Anthony Green was born in 1908 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School. He qualified M.B., Ch.B. in New Zealand, F.R.C.S.(Eng.), D.M.R.E.(Cantab.), and F.F.R. (London). He was at one time member of the executive committee and A.R.B. of the British Medical Association, member of the Evidence Committee for the Spens Report and of the Committee for the Report on the Care of the Chronic Sick. At present he is a member of the Consultants and Specialists Committee, North West Metropolitan Region. Green has been a member of the Medical Research Council and attached to the Royal Marsden (Cancer Hospital) staff. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. At present he is director of the radiotherapy departments of the Royal Northern and Prince of Wales General Hospitals and consultant to Mount Vernon and other hospitals.

Hawksworth, William, O.B.E.

(1911– ).

Obstetrician and gynaecologist.

William Hawksworth was born at Brightwater, Nelson, New Zealand, on 3 March 1911. He attended Wairarapa High School and Nelson College before studying medicine at the University of Otago. He served with the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force in command of the 6th New Zealand Field Ambulance. In the United Kingdom Hawksworth gained an Oxford master's degree in arts and qualified both F.R.C.S. and F.R.C.O.G. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and a member of the Council of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. His present position is consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist to the United Oxford Hospitals.

Hindenach, Jack Carl Rudolf

(1905– ).

Orthopaedic surgeon.

J. C. R. Hindenach was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 19 May 1905. After gaining a doctorate in medicine at the University of Otago, where he was also prominent as a rugby player, he won a medical travelling scholarship in 1930 and studied for F.R.C.S. in the United Kingdom. He was medical superintendent at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children from 1933 to 1935, and in 1937 became registrar at St. George's Hospital. During the Second World War he was an orthopaedic consultant in the Emergency Medical Service, 1939–40, and an orthopaedic specialist to the Army, 1941–46. His present position is consultant orthopaedic surgeon at West London Hospital, Hampstead General Hospital, and Queen Elizabeth Hospital for Children.

Jolly, Douglas Waddell, O.B.E.

(1904– ).

Orthopaedic surgeon

Douglas Jolly was born at Cromwell, Otago, New Zealand, on 16 December 1904 and educated at Otago Boys' High School, Dunedin. In 1924 he commenced his medical studies at the University of Otago. He undertook post-graduate studies in New Zealand and London between 1930 and 1935 and the following year began a three-year term as a field surgeon in the Spanish Republican Medical Service with the rank of Major. This instigated his writing Field Surgery in Total War, published in London in 1940. Between 1940 and 1946 he was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the RAMC, and served in England, the Middle East, and Italy as officer in charge of the Surgical Division, Military Hospital. His present position is that of Senior Medical Officer, Ministry of Health, Artificial Limb Service, Queen Mary's (Roehampton) Hospital, London.

Jory, Norman Adams

(1896– ).

Aural surgeon.

Norman Jory was born at Lawrence, Otago, New Zealand, on 27 July 1896. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and graduated bachelor of science at Auckland University College, where he won both junior and senior scholarships. He proceeded to St. Bartholomew's Hospital and College in London to study for F.R.C.S. He is now aural surgeon at St. Bartholomew's and a consultant to London County Council hospitals. Jory served in the First World War as a Lieutenant in the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, while in the Second World War he was an ear, nose, and throat surgeon in the Emergency Medical Service. He is vice-president of the Otology Section of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Jory, Philip John, D.S.O.

(1892– ).

Aural surgeon.

Philip Jory, the elder brother of the above, was born at Port Chalmers on 1 March 1892. He was educated at Nelson College, and at the University of Otago, New Zealand, where he obtained a senior scholarship. After four years' war service (1914–18) he specialised as an ear, nose, and throat surgeon and became surgeon at St. George's, Mount Vernon, Barnet General, Woodford Jubilee, and Harpenden Memorial Hospitals. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and is a former president of the Otology Section. During the Second World War he served as a Colonel in the RAMC. Philip Jory has been living in retirement at Old Felixstowe, Suffolk, since 1958.

Macintosh, Sir Robert Reynolds

(1897– ).

Professor of anaesthetics, University of Oxford.

Sir Robert Macintosh was born at Timaru, New Zealand, on 17 October 1897 and educated at Waitaki Boys' High School, later studying medicine at Guy's Hospital, London. His service in the First World War earned him mention in dispatches and he was awarded the Order of Military Merit in the Spanish Civil War. Sir Robert was consultant in anaesthetics to the RAF in the Second World War. He practised as an anaesthetist in London from 1926 to 1937 when he was appointed to his present position of Nuffield professor of anaesthetics, University of Oxford. He was knighted in 1955 and is the author of several textbooks on anaesthetics.

Malcolm, John Lawrence

(1913– ).

Regius professor of physiology, University of Aberdeen.

John Lawrence Malcolm was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, in August 1913, the son of Professor John Malcolm, and was educated at John McGlashan College, Dunedin. He graduated bachelor of medical science in 1935 and M.B., Ch.B. in 1938 at the University of Otago. From 1940 to 1947 he was a lecturer in the physiology department of the Otago Medical School, followed by a year's research work at the National Institute for Medical Research at Hampstead, London. His next appointment was reader in physiology at St. Mary's Hospital Medical School for three years till 1952. In 1952–53 he was visiting professor at the New York State University Medical School, Brooklyn. For the next five years he was on the research staff of the National Institute for Medical Research and, in 1959, he was appointed to his present position, regius professor of physiology at the University of Aberdeen.

Maloney, George Edward

(1912– ).

Surgeon.

George Maloney was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 26 June 1912. He was educated at Otago Boys' High School and qualified M.B., Ch.B. at the University of Otago in 1935. He then spent some time as demonstrator in physiology, demonstrator in pathology, and house surgeon at New Plymouth Hospital before leaving for England in 1939. After a year at the British Post-graduate Medical School at Harmondsworth he worked for nearly three years in the East End of London at Hackney Hospital in the Emergency Medical Service. This was followed by a year at Stoke Mandeville Hospital treating civilians and casualties from overseas. At the end of the war he was appointed surgical registrar for a year, then surgical tutor for a year at the Radcliffe Infirmary, since when he has been a consultant surgeon. He is a member of University College, Oxford, examiner in surgery, University of Oxford, member of the Council of the Surgical Section of the Royal Society of Medicine, and of the Council of the British Medical, Association. Maloney is at present consultant surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary and Churchill Hospital, Oxford.

Mowlem, Arthur Rainsford

(1902– ).

Plastic surgeon (retired).

Arthur Rainsford Mowlem was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 21 December 1902. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and at the University of Otago, where he obtained his M.B., Ch.B. In 1929 he took his F.R.C.S. and was successively officer-in-charge, London County Council Plastic Surgery Unit (1933–37); assistant plastic surgeon, St. Andrew's Hospital (1937–39); surgeon-in-charge, North-west Centre of Plastic Surgery (1939–53), Hunterian professor at the Royal College of Surgeons (1940), and surgeon in charge of the department for plastic surgery, Middlesex Hospital (1939–62). He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, a member of the British Orthopaedic Association, past president of the British Association of Plastic Surgeons (1950 and 1959), president of the International Congress on Plastic Surgery (1959), and a member of the Editorial Committee of the British Association of Plastic Surgeons. Dr Mowlem retired in 1962 and lives at Malaga, Spain.

Murdoch, James Duncan, O.B.E.

(1900– ).

Obstetrician and gynaecologist.

James Murdoch was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 19 September 1900 and was educated at Otago Boys' High School and the University of Otago. From 1927 to 1930 he was on the staff of the Auckland Hospital and in 1932 was commissioned in the Indian Medical Service. His positions before he retired as Major in 1947 included Surgical Specialist and Surgeon to the Army in Burma, principal and surgeon at Orissa Medical School, surgeon and professor at Hospital for Women, Prince of Wales Medical College, Patna, Bihar. He then took up his present appointment of consultant obstetrical and gynaecological surgeon at Hammersmith Hospital. He is also senior lecturer at the Institute of Obstetrics and gynaecology at the Postgraduate Medical School of London and holds the qualifications F.R.C.S. (Edin.) and F.R.C.O.G.

Nissen, Karl Iversen

(1906– ).

Orthopaedic surgeon.

K. I. Nissen was born at Milton, Otago, New Zealand, on 4 April 1906 and attended Tokomairiro District High School and Otago Boys' High School. After qualifying B.Sc. and M.D. at the University of Otago he went to England and gained his F.R.C.S. In the Second World War he served for four years in the Emergency Medical Service and for three years in the Royal Navy Medical Service, mainly at Durban. Since the war he has worked in North London, especially at Harrow. His present position is surgeon at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London. His publications include works on the disorders of the foot and of the hip joint.

Porritt, Sir Arthur Espie, BART., K.C.M.G., K.C.V.O., K.ST.J., C.B.E.

(1900– ).

Sergeant-Surgeon to Her Majesty the Queen.

Sir Arthur Porritt was born at Wanganui, New Zealand, on 10 August 1900. He was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School and the University of Otago and, as a Rhodes scholar, proceeded to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he qualified M.A. and M.Ch. He studied further at St. Mary's Hospital, London, and is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. Several universities have conferred honorary degrees on him Hon. LL.D. (St. Andrews and N.Z.) Hon. M.D. (Bristol) Hon. F.R.C.S.(Edin.), Hon. F.R.A.C.S., Hon. F.A.C.S. As well as pursuing a very distinguished medical career, Sir Arthur has a fine reputation as an athlete. He captained the New Zealand Olympic Games team in Paris in 1924 and won a bronze medal in the 100 metres race; he captained the Olympic team in Amsterdam in 1928 and was manager in Berlin in 1936. As an Oxford representative he broke several records in running and hurdling and has continued this interest as chairman of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games Federations from 1949 and as a member of the International Olympic Committee since 1935. He held the rank of Brigadier in the RAMC in the Second World War and was consulting surgeon to the 21st Army Group. At present he is surgeon at St. Mary's, Royal Masonic, and other hospitals, and consulting surgeon to the Army. Sir Arthur has served as past and acting president of the British Medical Association, as president of the Hunterian Society, and on a number of other professional bodies. He is president of the Royal College of Surgeons. From 1946 to 1952 he was a Surgeon to King George VI, and, since then, has been Sergeant-Surgeon to the Queen.

Rutter, Allenson Gordon

(1912– ).

Surgeon.

Although A. G. Rutter was born in England, he arrived in New Zealand when he was one year old. He was educated at Wairarapa High School, Victoria University College, and the University of Otago, where he graduated M.B., Ch.B. He did post-graduate work in London, 1936–38, and holds the qualifications D.T. M. and H. (London) and F.R.C.S. (Edin.). In 1938 he went to the British Solomon Islands with the Methodist Missionary Society. After the Japanese occupation he was appointed Senior Medical Officer for the Government. In 1948 he retired from the Colonial Medical Service and settled in England. He is at present consultant surgeon to Queen Mary's Hospital, London.

Smith, Sir Sydney Alfred, C.B.E., Order of the Nile (third class), Order Polonia Restiuta (third class)

(1833– ).

Emeritus professor of forensic medicine, University of Edinburgh.

Sydney Smith was born at Roxburgh, Central Otago, New Zealand, on 4 August 1883 and was educated there and at Victoria University College, Wellington. He qualified as a pharmaceutical chemist and proceeded to Edinburgh University in 1908 to study medicine. He graduated M.B., Ch.B. in 1912 and obtained the diploma in public health in 1913. In 1914 he completed his M.D. degree. Among the positions he has held are rector, acting principal, and dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Edinburgh; principal medicolegal expert to the Government of Egypt; professor of medical jurisprudence at the University of Egypt; consultant in forensic medicine to the World Health Organisation; regius professor of forensic medicine at the University of Edinburgh (emeritus since 1953). He was at one stage a Medical Officer of Health in New Zealand and, during the First World War, was a Major in the New Zealand Medical Corps. He has taken an active part on professional committees and associations and he has been honoured recently by the New York University with the award of a Medal of Honour for his contributions to forensic medicine. Sir Sydney has written extensively about his subject — his Text Book of Forensic Medicine (1925) is now in its tenth edition; Mostly Murder, an Autobiography, has been reprinted five times since it was published in 1959. His works have been published in German, Spanish, Arabic, and Armenian. Sir Sydney was knighted in 1949 for his services to forensic medicine.

Stewart, Murray Alexander

(1914– ).

Radiotherapist.

Murray Stewart was born at Ngaruawahia, New Zealand, on 15 March 1914 and educated at Southland and Timaru Boys' High Schools. After graduating M.B., Ch.B. from the University of Otago he spent two years at Waikato Hospital before qualifying as D.M.R. at Royal Marsden Hospital, London, in 1940. The following year he was resident radiological officer at Christie Hospital, Manchester, and then became assistant medical officer at the Sheffield Radium Centre till 1943. Since then he has been at the Liverpool Radium Centre. He was admitted M.R.C.P. (Edin.) in 1959. Dr Stewart is deputy director of the Liverpool Regional Radiotherapy Centre and of the Liverpool Radium Institute, consultant radiotherapist for the Liverpool Regional Hospital Board, and honorary associate lecturer at the University of Liverpool.

Walker (née Reader), Vera Birdie (1901– )

Allergist.

Dr Walker was born at Blenheim, New Zealand, on 21 July 1901 and attended Masterton District High School before she undertook a science course at Victoria University College, where she gained a master's degree. In London she studied for a D. Phil, in chemistry and, at Oxford, she gained a B.Sc. In addition she holds M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. Dr Walker has been especially interested in the study of allergies and was founder-member and first president of the British Association of Allergists. She has also been a member of the executive council of the International Association of Allergology. At present she is consultant physician in Oxford and Bournemouth and is specialist in allergic diseases to United Oxford Hospitals and Reading Regional Hospital Board.

8. Miscellaneous Occupations

Falla, Paul Stephen

(1913– ).

Deputy Research Director, Foreign Office.

Paul Falla was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 25 October 1913. He was educated at Wellington College and Christ's College before entering Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated. In 1936 he entered the Foreign Office and was posted to Warsaw, 1938–39; Ankara, 1939–43; Teheran, 1943. For the next three years he was back in London, before being sent as a member of the United Kingdom delegation to the United Nations, 1946–49. In 1950 he became a counsellor and held this rank till 1959 when he was appointed to his present position.

Grinstead, Eric Douglas

(1921– ).

Assistant keeper, Department of Oriental Printed Books and Manuscripts, British Museum.

Eric Grinstead was born at Wanganui, New Zealand, on 30 July 1921 and was educated at Wanganui Technical College and Victoria University College. After gaining a master's degree in arts he did post-graduate work at the University of London for a bachelor's degree. His special interest in Asian languages led to his present position, assistant keeper in the Department of Oriental Printed Books and Manuscripts at the British Museum.

Hamilton, Archibald Milne

(1898– ).

Consulting engineer.

Archibald Hamilton was born at Waimate, New Zealand, on 18 November 1898 and was educated at Waitaki Boys' High School. He studied engineering at Canterbury University College and has qualified in various branches — B.E.(N.Z.), M.I.C.E., M.I.Mech.E., M.Cons.E., and M.Soc.Civ.Engrs., (France). Initially he was employed by the Lyttelton Harbour Board and designed a wave model for planning the improvement of the port. He next worked at the Admiralty in London designing the Singapore Naval Base. His work in Kurdistan inspired him to write the book Road Through Kurdistan. Incidentally he devised a new type of bridge, which enabled any span or strength of bridge to be erected quickly from standard parts. The War Office adopted this type of bridging for operations in the Second World War and since then it has been used throughout the world for the construction and reconstruction of roads and bridges. He has acted as consultant to the governments of several countries, to bridge-construction firms, and to structural engineers.

Lowe, Sir Albert George

(1901– ).

Commissioner, United Kingdom Foreign Compensation Commission.

Albert Lowe was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 5 June 1901 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College, where he qualified as a barrister and solicitor. After 10 years in legal practice he became Legal Secretary in Tonga from 1938, when he joined the RNZAF for five years' service. After the war he was posted to Kenya as Crown Counsel, and in the four years he was there acted as Solicitor-General and Legal Draftsman at times. From 1949 to 1953 he was Acting Lieutenant-Governor in Malta for periods during his appointment as Legal Secretary. Before he became Chief Justice in Fiji (1954–60) Sir Albert was for five years Prison Judge in Tanganyika. Since 1961 he has been Commissioner of the United Kingdom Foreign Compensation Commission. He was created Knight Bachelor in 1961.

Lowe, Wallace George, O.B.E.

(1924– ).

Mountaineer, photographer, and schoolmaster.

George Lowe was born at Napier, New Zealand, on 15 January 1924 and was educated at Hastings High School. He trained as a primary-school teacher at Wellington Teachers' College, 1944–45. His interest in climbing developed from his various trips to North Island mountains and the Southern Alps in the next five years. His skill and experience led to his joining several expeditions to Garwhal Himalaya and Nepal Himalaya. With Hillary, he was a member of the party which made the first ascent of Mount Everest. In 1954 he climbed Mahalu. From 1955 to 1958 he was a member of the Trans-Antarctic Expedition, working as a photographer, after which he joined the teaching staff at Repton School, Derby. Since then he has been to Greenland and Nepal Himalaya to make films.

Miles, Michael

(1920– ).

Television producer.

Michael Miles was born in 1920 and educated at Scots College, entering the New Zealand Broadcasting Service in 1938. He is probably best known for his quiz programmes, one of which, “Take Your Pick”, which has run several years on commercial television in Great Britain. Before going to London Miles worked in Australia, Singapore, South Africa, the United States, and Europe. In the United Kingdom he spent three years touring the music halls with one of his quiz programmes. At present he is also giving a weekly sound programme for the British Broadcasting Corporation, called “Quiz Party”.

Mousley, Edward Opotiki

(1886– ).

Jurist and author.

Edward Mousley was born at Opotiki, New Zealand, on 27 March 1886. He graduated LL.B. at Victoria University College and continued his studies at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (M.A. and LL.B.), and Lincoln's Inn. During active service in the First World War he was taken prisoner at Kut-el-Amara and was mentioned in special post-war dispatches for gallantry in attempting escape over the Marmora Sea. He was Chief Legislative Draftsman for the Judicial Department in Mesopotamia, 1919–20. As a member of the British Empire delegation he attended the Washington Conference, 1921–22, the Hague Conference in 1922, and the Third Assembly of the League of Nations; he has also acted as Legal Advisor to the Reparation Claims Department (Sumner Commission). He has published a number of books, ranging from The Place of International Law in Jurisprudence, The Secrets of a Kuttite, and The Democratic Advance, to novels, such as An English Odyssey.

Partridge, Eric Honeyman

(1894– ).

Lexicographer.

Eric Honeyman Partridge was born on 6 February 1894 at the Waimata Valley, Gisborne, and educated at the Gisborne School and Queensland and Oxford Universities. He was a school teacher from 1910 to 1913 and then served in the Australian Infantry (1915–18). After the war he became Queensland Travelling Fellow at Oxford, lectured at Manchester and London Universities (1923–27), and was founder and managing director of the Scholartis Press (1927–31). Since 1932 he has made his living as an author, more recently specialising in etymology. Eric Partridge's works include Slang Today and Yesterday (1942); A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1933); Usage and Abusage (1942); A Dictionary of Cliches (1940); English for Human Beings (1949); A Dictionary of the Underworld (1950); Here There and Everywhere (1950); From Sanskrit to Brazil (1952); You Have a Point There (1953); The Concise Usage and Abusage (1954); English Gone Wrong (1957); Origins – an Etymological Dictionary of English (1958); Name This Child (1959); A Charm of Words (1960); Adventuring Among Words (1961); Comic Alphabets (1961); and The Gentle Art of Lexicography (1963).

Platts-Mils, John Faithful Fortescue

(1906– ).

Barrister and former member of Parliament.

John Platts-Mills was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 4 October 1906 and was educated at Nelson College and Victoria University College, where he qualified as a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court in 1928. He was awarded a Rhodes scholarship and continued his studies at Balliol College, Oxford. Platts-Mills was called to the Bar of Inner Temple, London, in 1932. During the Second World War he was a pilot officer in the RAF for a time, then a “Bevin Boy” in the Yorkshire coal mines for 18 months, and a collier in 1945. At the end of the war he was elected Labour member of Parliament for Finsbury till 1948, when he was successful as Independent Labour member for Finsham. From 1945 to 1950 he was also a Finsbury borough councillor. He has taken an active part in a number of associations – the Haldane Society, National Council for Civil Liberties, Connolly Society, Unity Theatre, British Soviet Friendship Society (of which he is chairman), and Societies for Friendship with Yugoslavia, Poland, and Czechoslovakia. He is also a member of several national workers' unions and a Trades Council delegate.

Sisam, Kenneth

(1887– ).

Formerly fellow of Merton College, Oxford, and language scholar.

Kenneth Sisam was born at Opotiki, New Zealand, on 2 September 1887. After studying at Auckland Grammar School he graduated master of arts from Auckland University College and was awarded a Rhodes scholarship in 1910. At Merton College he graduated master of arts and bachelor of literature. He spent five years, from 1917 to 1922, at the Ministry of Food, and in 1923 was a member of the secretariat of Oxford University Press. From 1942 to 1948 he was again associated with the Press, as secretary to the delegates. As an authority on early English literature he is probably best known for his publications Fourteenth Century Verse and Prose (1921) and Studies in the History of Old English Literature (1953). In 1959 he was joint editor of the Salisbury Psalter, and in 1960 he published Anglo-Saxon Royal Genealogies. He was admitted as a fellow of the British Academy in 1941, holds an honorary D.Litt. from Reading University, and was honoured as a Grand Knight of the Icelandic Falcon in 1948.

Skeet, Trevor Herbert Harry

(1918– ).

Former member of Parliament.

Trevor Skeet was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 28 January 1918. He was educated at King's College, Auckland, and graduated LL.B. from Auckland University College. During the Second World War he served with the New Zealand Engineers, but transferred to the New Zealand Anti-aircraft (Heavy) Regiment, then to the RNZNVR. He was a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand and was called to the English bar in 1947. In 1950 he became Conservative candidate, but was defeated in the 1951 and 1955 general elections. From 1959 until 1964 he represented Willesden East in the House of Commons. He served on the Council of the Royal Empire (now Royal Commonwealth) Society, 1952–55 and 1956–59, and is actively associated with the Commonwealth and Empire Industries Association. He is vice-president of the South Kensington Young Conservative Association.

Two other New Zealanders may be mentioned in this group: the late F. A. Taylor (1890-1960), of Auckland, who was student and librarian at Christ Church, Oxford, for many years; and J. B. Trapp, who is, at present, assistant librarian at the Warburg Institute of the University of London.

9. Music

New Zealanders prominent in music in Great Britain range from conductors and vocal and instrumental soloists to members of orchestras and chamber music ensembles.

Among the solo pianists are Esther Fisher (Lady Barran), a Wellington woman who studied at the Paris Conservatoire in the twenties and who now broadcasts and gives concerts, as well as teaches at the Royal College of Music; Joan Havill, of Wanganui, who has made exceptional progress in piano concerto work in her three years in London under Cyril Smith; another of Cyril Smith's pupils, Barry Morgan, of Auckland, has also proved himself recently as a student of considerable talent.

Apart from the late Richard Farrell, the most widely acclaimed pianist is probably Colin Horsley. He was born at Wanganui in 1920 and attended the Wanganui Technical College. He won a Royal Schools scholarship for study at the Royal College of Music, where he is now a professor. As one of the foremost British concert pianists he has appeared as soloist with all the leading orchestras; he broadcasts frequently and has recorded much solo and orchestral music. He has toured widely in Europe and Australasia, as well as playing at the United Nations Concert in New York.

Another New Zealander who has won an enviable reputation as a concert pianist is Peter Cooper, of Christchurch. He has lived in England since 1946, when he won a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music. In recent years he has toured widely, giving concerts under the auspices of the British Council.

A pianist, now conductor, is Ashley Lawrence. He joined the Royal Ballet Co. as rehearsal pianist in 1962 and a few months later was appointed assistant conductor. As well as studying at the Royal College of Music, he has attended a summer school under the conductor Rafael Kubelik at Lucerne, and has had the honour of conducting the final concert at the Lucerne Festival.

Max Saunders, an Aucklander, had started composing music before he left New Zealand 25 years ago. Apart from a short time in Sydney with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, he has spent most of this period as composer, arranger, and conductor for the British Broadcasting Corporation. He has written incidental music for about 70 radio and television plays and features, as well as several film scores. His serious compositions include orchestral and chamber work and three short operas.

One of Britain's leading conductors, Warwick Braithwaite, was born at Dunedin, studied music there, and then went'to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music. In the 1920s he was conductor of the Cardiff Musical Society and the National Orchestra of Wales; from 1932 to 1940 he conducted for the Sadler's Wells Opera Co.; 1940–46, was conductor of the Scottish Orchestra; and in 1948 he became principal conductor of the Sadler's Wells Ballet Co. From 1949 to 1953 he conducted opera at Covent Garden before spending a year with the New Zealand National Orchestra and a further year as musical director of the National Opera of Australia. His current position is that of musical director of the Welsh National Opera Co. Warwick Braithwaite has made numerous recordings with leading British orchestras; he has published a book entitled The Conductor's Art.

Among the instrumentalists who hold high position is John McCaw, the Dunedin clarinettist, who was with the National Orchestra till 1948, when he left to join the London Philharmonic Orchestra. He is now principal clarinettist with this orchestra. Another talented New Zealander is Alan Loveday, who studied under Albert Sammons at the Royal College of Music where he was an outstanding student, winning the Tagore Gold Medal in 1947 and the Queen's Prize in 1948. Since then he has given many solo concerts and taken part in chamber music recitals. Layton King found scope for his interest in early keyboard instruments with the Delmetsch family at Haslemere. He not only helps to build harpsichords and other instruments, but also gives recitals, lectures, and tuition. Both he and his wife, Christine (also of Auckland), an able wind player, have recorded early music for BBC programmes.

Denis Dowling has achieved considerable praise both for his singing and for his acting as principal baritone at Sadler's Wells for the past 13 years. He was born at Ranfurly, Otago, and early in his career won the Melbourne Sun Aria Prize. He continued his studies at the Royal College of Music. After serving with the Royal Artillery in the Second World War (mentioned in dispatches) he resumed his musical career at Glyndebourne in 1947. He has appeared at Covent Garden and European international opera festivals and has given broadcast and televised concerts.

Another permanent member of Sadler's Wells Opera is the baritone John Hauxvell, from Auckland. He arrived in England in 1949 and, after studying in London and Italy, was very active in singing for broadcasting, television, and sound recording. Another New Zealander Bryan Drake, of Dunedin, is principal baritone with the Welsh National Opera Company.

In 1947 the Maori bass baritone, Inia te Wiata, left to study in London. In the following years he made steady progress in the field of grand opera, which led to his being engaged as one of the leading bass singers at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. His natural ability for acting won him a film role in “The Seekers”, and he has made a name for himself in musicals and on the concert platform as well. His tours include two back to New Zealand, one to Russia, and a season on Broadway, New York.

Andrew Gold, one of the most active members of the New Zealand Music Society in London, is a tenor of considerable artistry who has had many engagements. In 1965 he was appointed Chief Assistant of the B.B.C. light music division. Another New Zealand tenor, Jon Andrews, is with the Sadler's Wells Opera Company.

In the field of revue Brian Hasler, a talented singer, elocutionist, and pianist, has an act which has aroused television and recording interest. As Mr “Fingers” Pennywick Smyth he plays anything from semi-classical to ultra modern on a honkytonk piano in the celebrated fish parlour in Kensington, “The Contented Sole”.

Although Joan Hilda Hood Hammond, C.B.E., the operatic, concert, and oratorio soprano, was born in St. Albans, Christchurch, on 24 May 1912, and is thus a New Zealander by birth, she was educated and spent her early years in Sydney. Since her debut in Sydney in 1929 she has given concerts in many countries and has sung in some of the most famous theatres in the world.

10. Science

Black, Donald Harrison, C.M.G.

(1899– ).

Director, Royal Armament Research and Development Establishment, War Office.

Donald Black was born at Nelson, New Zealand, on 18 June 1899. From Nelson College he entered Canterbury University College in 1918 and graduated master of science in 1922. He did research work for a doctorate of philosophy in physics at Emmanuel College and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. From 1925 till the outbreak of the Second World War he was on the staff of Standard Telephones and Cables Ltd. (and associates). He then spent two periods as Superintendent of Research in the Ministry of Supply's Radar Research and Development Establishment. These were separated by two years which he spent as Admiralty Liaison Officer in the United States of America. In 1949 he became Director of Electronics Research and Development after two years as Assistant Director of Telecommunication Research and Development. From 1953 to 1956 he was head of the United Kingdom Ministry of Supply Staff and Scientific Adviser to the United Kingdom High Commissioner to Australia. After two further years as Director-General of Electronics Research and Development he became Director of Armament Research and Development Establishment in 1958, initially with the Ministry of Supply, now with the War Office.

Cox, Percy Thomas, M.B.E.

(1902– ).

Managing director, British Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd.

Percy Cox was born at Ashburton, New Zealand, on 6 March 1902 and was educated at Christ's College before enrolling for an arts course at Canterbury University College. He graduated master of arts in 1923 and joined the staff of Geological Survey for a year. His plan to do a year's post-graduate study at Cambridge was deferred by his acceptance of a six months' assignment with the Anglo-Persian Oil Co. to do a prospecting survey in Peru. In 1925 he accepted a permanent position with this company, which subsequently became the Anglo-Iranian Oil Co., and British Petroleum Co. Ltd. As a member of the geological staff he undertook surveys in Jamaica, Venezuela, and Colombia from 1925 to 1928, then went to Persia. From 1929 to 1930 he did post-graduate study at the Sorbonne, Paris. The next six years he spent in Persia, then a year in England, followed by a year back in Colombia. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Engineers in the United Kingdom and Europe, finally attaining the rank of Major. He was mentioned in dispatches and was awarded the M.B.E. (Military Division). He returned to Persia in 1946 to do mainly administrative work and from 1948 to 1951 was general fields manager for the Anglo-Iranian Oil Co. Since then he has been in the London headquarters of the company, first as exploration manager, then for a short time as Chief Geologist, and, from 1956, managing director of the British Petroleum Exploration Co., subsidiary wholly owned by the British Petroleum Co. Ltd.

McIlraith, Arthur Hamilton

(1923– ).

Senior Scientific Officer, Light Division, National Physical Laboratory.

McIlraith was born at Christchurch on 5 June 1923 and was educated at Rangiora High School and Oxford District High School. He took a science course at Victoria and Canterbury University Colleges. He has been awarded several fellowships for research work – I.C.I. (N.Z.) research fellow, 1952–54; New Zealand University research fellow, 1955; and senior research fellow in the Department of Natural Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen, 1957–60. His present position is that of Senior Scientific Officer of the Light Division, National Physical Laboratory, Feddington.

Mitchell, John Wesley, F.R.S.

(1913– ).

Director of the National Chemical Laboratory of the United Kingdom.

John Wesley Mitchell was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 3 December 1913 and was educated at Canterbury University College, where he gained his M.Sc. in 1934. As an 1851 Exhibition scholar, he did post-graduate study for a D.Phil, in physics at the University of Oxford, and, in 1960 he also qualified D.Sc. In the Second World War he was employed by the British Ministry of Supply as a Research Physicist. From 1945 to 1959 he was a reader in experimental physics at the University of Bristol. He is a member of the Royal Physical Society (Bay Prize, 1955), fellow of the Royal Photographic Society (Greenwich Memorial Medal, 1956), and fellow of the Royal Society. From 1959 to 1964 he was professor of physics at the University of Virginia, then he became director of the National Chemical Laboratory of the United Kingdom.

Straker, Thomas William

(1915– ).

Deputy manager, Radar Division of the Marconi Co.

Straker was born at Granity on 2 October 1915 and was educated at Nelson College and Canterbury University College. During the Second World War he was a Major with the New Zealand Forces in the Middle East, where he was captured and sent to Italy. He escaped to Switzerland, and in 1944 was conducting physics courses at Geneva University. Since the war he has been a lecturer at Canterbury University College, researcher in radio at Cambridge, England, a member of the Defence Research Board of Canada, Canadian Research Liaison Officer in London, and a member of the Air Defence Technical Centre in the Hague. He joined the Marconi Co. in 1957 as chief of the project coordination group. In 1960 he became deputy manager of the company's radar division.

Winter, Ramsay Middleton

(1896– ).

Research controller, Imperial Chemical Industries (retired).

Although he was born in Scotland, Ramsay Winter came to New Zealand when he was four years old. He attended Cambridge District High School and Auckland Grammar School before studying for a master of science degree at Auckland University College. In 1916 he gained a senior university scholarship in chemistry, which he held over till after the First World War. He volunteered for active service in 1916 and was commissioned in 1917. During service in France with the 1st Battalion, Auckland Regiment, he was wounded. In 1919 he was able to pursue post-graduate study at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London and, in the following year, became 1851 Exhibition science research scholar. He spent 1921 at Rothampsted Experimental Station, Harpendew, before joining the Explosives Research Department, Woolwich, until 1928. The rest of his working life he spent with Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., first as a research chemist at Billingham Works, County Durham, then as research manager of the general chemicals division. In 1937 he was transferred to the research department at head office, and in 1946 was appointed research controller, a position he held until his retirement in 1958.

Among other scientists in the United Kingdom are Robert Hurst, who is in charge of the Dountreay Atomic Energy Station, Scotland; D. M. T. Somerville, the mathematician who has achieved considerable repute for his inventions of calculating machines; and D. Peak, research director at Boots Pharmaceutical Laboratory, and E. H. Sealy, finance director of the British Coal Board's Yorkshire Division; all these have obtained doctorates.

11. Theatre

As New Zealand offers full-time employment for a very small number of people interested in a stage career, it is not surprising that many have proceeded overseas to pursue their ambitions. Among the older expatriates the name of Marie Ney is a distinguished one. She came to New Zealand as a child in 1903 and was educated in Wellington at St. Mary's Convent. She had training in singing, elocution, dancing, and amateur opera as a preliminary to stage work, and in 1916 became a minor member of Allan Wilkie's Shakespearean Co. Her stage debut was made in Melbourne in 1917, and since then she has appeared in a wide variety of plays, in films, and on television.

Lesley Gaze, a Christchurch actor-singer, played in London's Gaiety Theatre under George Edwards and Robert Courtneidge before taking the lead in various New York productions. He appeared in Australia and New Zealand first in The Chocolate Soldier. Rupert Julian, the stage name of Percival Hayes, born at Whangaroa, played in the theatre with such actors as Beerbohm Tree and George Alexander; ultimately he went to Hollywood to do film work.

Several members of the New Zealand Players have settled in Great Britain to extend their range. Bridget Armstrong and her husband, Terence Bayler, have been cast in plays, films, and television performances. Nyree Porter is gaining a reputation for her talents, and Michael Cotterill, after playing with several English repertory companies, was selected as understudy for Professor Higgins in My Fair Lady at Drury Lane.

Vivienne Martin was only 17 when she left New Zealand to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. She has appeared in repertory productions, revues, television shows, films, and musical plays in the eight years she has spent overseas. Clive Revill is another versatile actor who has achieved acclaim, not only for his Shakespearean acting but also for his Gilbert and Sullivan singing. A cabaret career has led Lola Macdonald, of Wanganui, from a tour of New Zealand to the stage of the London Palladium, the Coliseum, and the Windmill Theatre.

Paddy Turner, from Masterton, won a Government bursary to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. She has appeared in a number of BBC plays, on commercial television, and in the French film, Journey to Biarritz. Phillipa Reid studied at the Old Vic School before working for some years in the musical theatre. Since then she has had roles both in repertory and in BBC productions, and is now an associate director of a newly formed London company.

A new TV personality in Britain is a young Aucklander, Noel Trevarthen, who for several years had played minor parts in English and continental films, as well as appearing as a part-time TV announcer. He played a prominent part in the BBC TV feature, The Flying Swan, and in June 1965 won a major role in a new super-detective series, Riviera Police.

12. University

Many New Zealand University graduates have taken posts in British universities. The following are among those who hold important positions.

Aitken, Alexander Craig, F.R.S.

(1895– ).

Professor of mathematics, University of Edinburgh.

Alexander Craig Aitken was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 1 April 1895 and was dux at Otago Boys' High School before entering the University of Otago in 1913 with a scholarship. His academic career was interrupted by the First World War, when he served in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Gallipoli and France. At the first Battle of the Somme in 1916 he was badly wounded and invalided back to New Zealand. In 1918 he resumed his university studies and graduated M.A. with first-class honours in languages and literature and secondclass honours in mathematics and mathematical physics in 1920. For four years following this he taught at Otago Boys' High School before leaving for Edinburgh in 1923 to undertake post-graduate study in mathematics. This led to a doctorate in science in 1925, since when he has been attached to the staff of Edinburgh University, as lecturer, 1925–36, as reader, 1936–46, and as professor of mathematics. He has published three textbooks (one of which was of joint authorship), and some 70 memoirs on various aspects of mathematics, including statistical and practical mathematics, numerical analysis, and modern algebra. He has recently published his reminiscences of First World War – From Gallipoli to the Somme.

Aitken, Sir Robert Stevenson

(1901– ).

Vice-chancellor, University of Birmingham.

Robert Aitken was born at Wyndham, New Zealand, on 16 April 1901 and educated at Gisborne High School before he began medical studies at the University of Otago. He graduated M.D. in 1922 and was selected a Rhodes scholar. His post-graduate study at Balliol College from 1924–26 culminated in his gaining D.Phil.(Oxon.), Hon.LL.D.(Dalh., Melb., Panjab, McGill, Pa., and Aberdeen), Hon.D.Sc. (Sydney), – and is a fellow of the R.C.P. (Edinburgh) and R.A.C.P. Between 1926 and 1934 Sir Robert was attached to the medical unit, the London Hospital. After this he was for four years reader in medicine at the British Post-graduate School of Medicine, University of London. In 1939 he was appointed regius professor of medicine at the University of Aberdeen and left this post in 1949 to return to New Zealand to be vice-chancellor of the University of Otago until 1953. Since then he has held the appointment of vice-chancellor at the University of Birmingham. Concurrently he has been vice-chairman of the Association of Universities of the British Commonwealth 1955–58, chairman of the Committee of Vice-chancellors and Principals 1958–61, and chairman of the Overseas Research Council since 1959. He was knighted in 1960.

Barrer, Richard Maling

(1910– ).

Professor of physical chemistry, Imperial College of Science and Technology.

Richard Maling Barrer was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 16 June 1910 and was educated at Wairarapa College in Masterton. He proceeded to Canterbury University College and gained first-class honours in chemistry in 1931. The following year he went to Clare College, Cambridge, where he was 1851 exhibitioner, senior research student, and research fellow. He gained Ph.D.(Cantab.) in 1935, D.Sc.(N.Z.) in 1937, and Sc.D.(Cantab.) in 1949. After leaving Cambridge University in 1939 he spent seven years as head of the chemistry department at Bradford Institute of Technology, then two years as reader in chemistry at London University. In 1948 he was appointed professor of chemistry in the University of Aberdeen, a post he relinquished in 1954 when he became professor of physical chemistry in London University at the Imperial College of Science and Technology. Apart from his university positions, Barrer has had service on several scientific societies, as well as on advisory and research committees. He is the author of a book Diffusion In and Through Solids and of many research publications. In 1956 he was elected to fellowship of the Royal Society and is also Hon. A.R.C.S. and F.R.I.C.

Baxter, Frederick William

(1897– ).

Professor of English language and literature, Queen's University of Belfast (retired).

Frederick William Baxter was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 29 April 1897 and attended Auckland Grammar School till 1914. His studies there were interrupted by war service in the Divisional Signal Company, New Zealand Engineers, 1917–19; after the war he was for a time Officer in Charge of General Education with the New Zealand Division in the Cologne area. He completed his degree at Worcester College, Oxford, graduating master of arts. His first appointments to lectureships were at the University of London (King's College), 1921–24; McGill University, Montreal, 1924–26; University of Leeds, 1926–30. Subsequently he joined the staff of Queen's University of Belfast as professor of English literature, 1930–49, and as professor of English language and literature from 1949 to 1958, when he retired. Professor Baxter acted as external examiner in English for the University of New Zealand from 1932 till 1938.

Bennett, Jack Arthur Walter

(1911– ).

Language scholar, lecturer, and fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford. J. A. W. Bennett was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 28 February 1911 and was educated at Mount Albert Grammar School. His academic success at Auckland University College won him the John Tinline scholarship in 1932 and a post-graduate scholarship in arts from the University of New Zealand in 1933. He continued his studies at Marton College, Oxford, as Harmsworth senior scholar, 1935–38. From 1938 to 1946 he was a research fellow of Queen's College, though during the Second World War he rose to the position of Director of the Research Department, British Information Services, U.S.A. His current position is lecturer in English language at Oxford, where he is a fellow of Magdalen College. He also edits Medium Aevum and is a member of the Council of the Early English Text Society. His interest in early texts is reflected in some of his publications – Devotional Pieces in Verse and Prose (edited for the Scottish Text Society), The Knight's Tale (ed.), The Parliament of Foules. He also collaborated in the publication of the poems of Richard Corbett.

Buchanan, Robert Ogilvie

(1894– ).

Emeritus professor of geography, London School of Economics.

Robert Ogilvie Buchanan was born at Maheno, near Oamaru, New Zealand, on 12 September 1894 and studied intermittently at the University of Otago between 1913 and 1921. After the First World War he spent a year teaching at Whangarei High School, and after graduating M.A. with first-class honours in economics he taught at Mount Albert Grammar School from 1922 to 1925. The next three years he studied at the London School of Economics, and he holds a bachelor of science in economics with first-class honours and a Ph.D. in economics from London University. He gave service during both world wars, first with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (2nd Otago Regiment), and later with the RAF. Professor Buchanan has been on the staff of the University of London since 1928 in various capacities: assistant lecturer and lecturer in geography, reader in economic geography, and professor of geography at the London School of Economics, his present position. He is also a member of the Senate and has been deputy vice-chancellor since 1961. In addition to numerous papers in various geographical periodicals he has written Pastoral Industries in New Zealand, An Economic Geography of the British Empire, and (with R. C. Estall) Industrial Activity and Economic Geography.

Burchfield, Robert William

(1923– ).

Editor, Oxford English Dictionary Supplement, philologist, and lecturer.

Robert Burchfield was born at Wanganui, New Zealand, on 27 January 1923 and was educated at Wanganui Technical College. His university studies were interrupted by war service with the Royal New Zealand Artillery in New Zealand and Italy, 1941–46. After another year as student at Victoria University College he was appointed there as a junior lecturer in English from 1947 to 1949, when he proceeded to Magdalen College, Oxford, as a Rhodes scholar. After gaining his bachelor's degree in 1951 he continued at Magdalen as senior Mackinnon scholar till 1953 and gained his master's degree. Later he became lecturer in English language at Christ Church, Oxford, till 1957, since when he has held the same position at St. Peter's Hall. In 1957 he became an editor for the Oxford English Dictionary Supplement (which is still in preparation). He is also an editor, with J. C. Maxwell, of Notes and Queries. He has published articles in Transactions of the Philological Society and in Medium Aevum and is honorary secretary of the Early English Text Society. With his wife he wrote The Land and People of New Zealand.

Carrington, Charles Edmund

, M.C. (1897– ).

Professor of British Commonwealth relations, Royal Institute of International Affairs (retired).

Although Charles Edmund Carrington was born in England, he was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. He returned to England for university studies at Christ Church, Oxford, and holds both Oxford and Cambridge degrees for master of arts. He won the Military Cross for service during the First World War in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. After the war he was an assistant master at Haileybury College, 1921–29. He then joined the Cambridge University Press until 1954 and served as a Lieutenant-Colonel on the General Staff during the Second World War. From 1954 to 1962 he was professor of British Commonwealth relations at the Royal Institute of International Affairs. He has served on a number of councils, including the London County Council Education Committee, the Inter-University Council, the Overseas Migration Board, and the Council of the Classical Associations. In 1959 he organised a Commonwealth Relations Conference in Palmerston North. Among his publications are Exposition of Empire (1947), The British Overseas (1950), Life of John Robert Godley (1951), Life of Rudyard Kipling (1955), and Liquidation of the British Empire (1961). Professor Carrington is a brother of Archbishop Carrington.

Cooper, Malcolm McGregor

(1910– ).

Dean of the faculty of agriculture and professor of rural economy, University of Durham.

Malcolm McGregor Cooper was born at Havelock North, New Zealand, on 17 August 1910 and was educated at Napier High School. His university studies in New Zealand were undertaken at Victoria University College and Massey Agricultural College, where he graduated bachelor of agricultural science. As a Rhodes scholar he studied for the degree of B.Litt. in agricultural economics and the diploma in rural economy. For the three years from 1937 to 1940 he was in the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research before being appointed lecturer at Massey Agricultural College till 1947. During this period he served for two years as a Major with the 22nd New Zealand Battalion. From 1947 to 1954 he was first holder of the chair in agriculture at Wye College, University of London. In 1954 he was appointed to his present position, professor of rural economy at King's College, University of Durham, where he is also dean of the faculty of agriculture. His publications and committee work have made him internationally known as an agricultural scientist. He has written Beef Production, Competitive Farming, and Grass Farming; he is former president and life member of the British Grassland Society, has served with the Advisory Committee for Agricultural Research for Sudan, Agricultural Improvement Council (Great Britain), and Natural Resources Committee (United Kingdom).

Copping, Alice Mary

(1906– ).

Senior lecturer in nutrition, Queen Elizabeth College, University of London.

Alice Copping was born at Stratford, New Zealand, on 14 May 1906. She graduated master of science from Victoria University College in 1926. The following year she was awarded the Sarah Ann Rhodes scholarship and did two years of research work under J. C. Drummond at University College, London. She returned to New Zealand for one year to lecture at the School of Home Science, University of Otago, before becoming personal assistant to Dame Harriette Church at the Division of Nutrition, Lister Institute, London. In 1931, when it was founded, she was appointed editorial assistant to the periodical Nutrition Abstracts and Reviews. Her work at the Lister Institute, which lasted till 1949, was mainly research on vitamin B complex, bread and wheat products, and on wartime diets. Since 1949 she has been on the staff of Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, currently as senior lecturer. She was awarded a senior Fulbright grant to spend one semester at the University of Connecticut in 1957, and was a consultant on nutrition education for the FAO/WHO symposium in 1959. In 1961 she was chairman of programme for the Third International Congress of Dietetics in London.

Costello, Desmond Patrick

(1912– ).

Mather professor of Russian, Victoria University, Manchester.

Desmond Patrick Costello was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 31 January 1912 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School. He attended Auckland University College, 1928–31, and Trinity College, Cambridge, 1932–36, gaining master of arts degrees from both. He was appointed assistant lecturer in classics at University College of South-west Exeter from 1936 to 1940. During the Second World War he served in Greece, 1941, North Africa, 1941–43, and Italy, 1943–44. The New Zealand Government then appointed him Secretary to its Legation in Moscow for six years, after which he became Secretary at its Paris Legation for four years. Since 1955 he has been Mather professor of Russian studies in the Victoria University, Manchester. Professor Costello has contributed papers on Russian subjects to various learned journals and has published translations of Russian texts. He died in Manchester on 23 February 1964.

Davies, John Tasman

(1924– ).

Professor of chemical engineering and director of chemical engineering department, University of Birmingham.

John Tasman Davies was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, on 1 May 1924 and was educated at Christchurch Boys' High School from 1937 to 1941. In the four years following he gained a master of science degree at Canterbury University College. During his post-graduate study and research he gained degrees of Ph.D. and D.Sc. from the University of London and a master of arts from the University of Cambridge. Since 1960 he has been professor of chemical engineering and director of that department in the University of Birmingham.

Davis, Norman, M.B.E.

(1913– ).

Professor of English language and literature, University of Oxford.

Norman Davis was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 16 May 1913 and was educated at Otago Boys' High School and the University of Otago. After graduating master of arts he proceeded as a Rhodes scholar to Merton College, Oxford, in 1934. He gained a B.A. in 1936 and a diploma in comparative philology a year later. The following two years he lectured in English at the University of Kaunas in Lithuania. His next position was lecturing in English at the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, 1938–39. After the outbreak of war he became an Assistant Press Attaché at the British Legation in Sofia till 1941. The remaining war years were spent mainly in the Middle East in the services of the British Government. In 1945 he was awarded the M.B.E. He resumed his university teaching as lecturer in English language at Queen Mary College, University of London, in 1946, having gained M.A. (Oxon.) in 1944. In 1947 he was appointed to a similar position at Oriel and Brasenose Colleges, Oxford, and in addition lectured in medieval English, 1948–49. From 1949 till 1959 he was professor of English language at the University of Glasgow. Since then he has been Merton professor of English language and literature at the University of Oxford. As well as contributing articles and reviews to journals, he has been joint editor of Review of English Studies since 1954. He has been honorary director of the Early English Text Society since 1957.

de la Mare, Peter Bernard David

(1920– ).

Professor of chemistry, Bedford College, University of London.

Peter Bernard David de la Mare was born at Hamilton, New Zealand, on 3 September 1920. He was educated at Hamilton High School and graduated M.Sc. from Victoria University College in 1942. For the next three years he worked as an agricultural chemist in the Department of Agriculture. He then undertook post-graduate study at University College, London, as Shirtcliffe fellow, and gained a Ph.D. in 1948. From then till 1960 he was on the staff of University College, as lecturer from 1949 and as reader from 1956. He took up his present appointment in 1960. In 1955 he qualified D.Sc. (Lond.).

Ellis, Stephen Robert Mercer

(1912– ).

Professor of chemical engineering, University of Birmingham.

Stephen Robert Mercer Ellis was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 14 December 1912. After taking his M.Sc. at Auckland University College he undertook post-graduate study in the United Kingdom for a doctorate in philosophy in chemical engineering. He had several years' industrial experience in England between 1937 and 1946 in the field of low-temperature carbonisation oil refinery practice and in the field of chemical plant design. He was appointed to the staff of the University of Birmingham in 1950, first as lecturer, then as reader, and finally, in 1957, to the second chair of chemical engineering, his present appointment. He has published numerous research papers in the field of distillation, liquid-liquid extraction, evaporation, and so on, and is a past member of the Council of the Institution of Chemical Engineers.

Firth, Raymond William

(1901– ).

Professor of anthropology, University of London.

Raymond William Firth was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 25 March 1901. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and at Auckland University College, where he took his M.A. in economics in 1922. From there he went to the London School of Economics, where in 1927 he obtained a Ph.D. in anthropology. He then undertook anthropological field research in Tikopia in 1928–29 and published We, the Tihopia: A Sociological Study of Kinship in Primitive Polynesia. In 1952 he again studied in Tikopia and wrote another work, Social Change in Tikopia: Re-study of a Polynesian Community After a Generation. As Leverhulme research fellow he did research in peasant economics and anthropology in Malaya, 1939–40, and again in 1947. Other areas where he has conducted surveys and research are West Africa, New Guinea, and Solomon Islands. His first academic appointment was lecturer in anthropology at the University of Sydney, 1930–31. The following year he was acting professor, before returning to the London School of Economics as lecturer in anthropology for three years. From 1935 to 1944 he was reader, and since then he has held the chair. For three years during the Second World War he served with the Naval Intelligence Division, Admiralty, and was Secretary of the Colonial Social Science Research Council, Colonial Office, 1944–45. His other important publications include Human Types, Elements of Social Organisation, and Primitive Economics of the New Zealand Maori. He became a fellow of the British Academy in 1948 and was president of the Royal Anthropological Institute from 1953 to 1955.

Greenwood, Leonard Hugh Graham

(1880– ).

Life fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

Leonard Greenwood was born at Gisborne, New Zealand, on 30 August 1880 and was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. After two years at Canterbury University College as a junior university scholar, he completed his master of arts degree at King's College, Cambridge. He was a fellow of this College from 1906 to 1909. Previously he had lectured in classics at the University of Leeds, 1903–04, 1905–07. In 1908 he spent a year back at Canterbury University College as acting professor of classics. He has been a fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, since 1909, tutoring and lecturing in classics for many years. During the First World War he gave service for three years in the Friends' Ambulance Unit; in the Second World War he was acting lecturer in classics at Victoria University College, a position he held again in 1950. His publications include Aristotle's Nicomechean Ethics Book VI, with commentary, 1911; Loeb Library edition of Cicero's Nerrine Orations, about 1928; and Aspects of Euripidian Tragedy 1952.

Hassall, Cedric Herbert

(1919– ).

Professor of chemistry, University of Swansea.

Cedric Hassall was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 6 December 1919. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School before studying for the degree of master of science at Auckland University College (1942). Subsequently he did a course at Auckland Teachers' Training College. His first appointment was as lecturer in chemistry at the University of Otago, 1942–45. The next two years were spent in research work for Ph.D. at the Chemical Laboratories, Cambridge, where he held a senior studentship, Royal Commission of 1851. From 1948 till 1956 he was first professor of chemistry at the University College of the West Indies, in Jamaica, during which time he was for a period a research fellow at Harvard University, under a Carnegie award. The Rockefeller Foundation awarded him a travelling fellowship in 1956 and, in the following year, he was appointed to his present position as head of the Department of Chemistry at the University College of Swansea in Wales. Professor Hassall has served on a number of national committees and those of learned societies, including the Chemical Society, Caribbean Research Council, and Government Grants Committee to Sierra Leone for Foural Bay University College. He is a fellow of the Royal Institute of Chemistry. His research studies on the chemistry of organic natural products, such as antibiotics, plant-colouring matters, cardiac glycosides, have been published mainly in the Journal of the Chemical Society.

McKellar, Thomas Peter Huntly

(1921– ).

Senior lecturer in psychology, University of Sheffield.

Peter McKellar was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 24 May 1921 and graduated M.A. from the University of Otago in 1942. He then joined the RNZAF and was a member of the psychological staff in their medical investigation unit until he was demobilised at the end of the war, when he was appointed assistant lecturer in psychology at the University of Otago. In 1947 he went to London and held an assistant lecturer's position at Bedford College till 1949. During this time he worked for a doctorate in philosophy at the University of London, awarded in 1949. For the next two years he was at the University of St. Andrews as lecturer in social psychology. From 1951 till 1955 he was lecturer in psychology at the University of Aberdeen. He has held his present appointment, senior lecturer in psychology at the University of Sheffield, since 1955. Apart from various papers in standard scientific journals, he has published A Textbook of Human Psychology (1952) and Imagination and Thinking (1957).

Mackenzie, Fraser

(1905– ).

Professor of French language and literature, University of Birmingham.

Fraser Mackenzie was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 3 November 1905 and educated at Wellington College and Victoria University College, where his father was professor of English language and literature. He left for Paris when he was 23 years old to do post-graduate study at the Sorbonne. He was appointed assistant lecturer in French at the University of St. Andrews in 1934, then senior lecturer in French at the University of Aberdeen in 1939. In 1946 he was appointed to his present position, professor of French language and literature at University of Birmingham. In 1948, 1950, 1952, and 1954 he was exchange professor of French at the University of Montpellier and was awarded a doctorate (h.c.) in 1952. He also holds a D.ès L. from Paris (1946) and was made Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur in 1954. He returned to New Zealand for the academic year in 1955 as guest professor of modern languages at Victoria University College. Professor Mackenzie has published Les Emprunts reciprogues de l'anglais et du francais, two volumes (Paris), 1946, and was editor of Studies in French Language, Literature and History presented to Professor R. L. Graeme Ritchie, 1949.

Owen, John Beresford

(1920– ).

Fellow and tutor in modern history, Lincoln College, Oxford.

John Beresford Owen was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 17 July 1920 and educated at Otago Boys' High School. He completed both master of arts and bachelor of science degrees in New Zealand at the University of Otago and Canterbury University College. From 1942 till 1946 he served in the RNZAF as a Forecasting Officer in the Meteorological Service. He was awarded a post-graduate scholarship in arts in 1947 and held a position at Victoria University College, 1947–48, as junior lecturer in history. From 1949 till 1954 he was lecturer in history and political science at Canterbury University College. He then went to England and spent two years as a research assistant to Sir Lewis Namier. His present position is fellow and tutor in modern history at Lincoln College, Oxford. He holds both M.A. and D.Phil. from Oxford University and has published The Rise of the Pelhams (1957), as well as reviews and articles in learned journals. His most recent book is The Eighteenth Century, 1714–1815.

Owen, Warwick Jack Burgoyne

(1916– ).

Senior lecturer in English, University of North Wales.

Warwick Owen was born at Auckland, New Zealand, on 12 May 1916 and was educated at Auckland Grammar School and Auckland University College, where he graduated master of arts in 1937. He was awarded both entrance and John Tinline scholarships. In 1938 and 1939 he was on the staff of Auckland University College, prior to going to Oxford University for post-graduate study. As soon as he had completed an Oxford master's degree he was commissioned, in 1942, in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, where he served until 1946 in the United Kingdom, North Africa, and Italy on Army telecommunications. He was on the staff of Formation College (C.M.) in 1946. That year he joined the staff of University College of North Wales in Bangor, and his current position there is that of senior lecturer in English. He has contributed to learned journals many articles, mainly on Edmund Spenser and William Wordsworth. He is the co-editor of Wordsworth's Prose Works. He holds a Ph.D.(Wales).

Phillips, Alban William Housego, M.B.E.

(1914– ).

Tooke professor of economic science and statistics, University of London.

A. W. H. Phillips was born at Dannevirke, New Zealand, on 18 November 1914. He was educated at Dannevirke High School before qualifying A.M.I.E.E., after which he held various posts in electrical engineering in New Zealand, Australia, and England. For the next five years he was in the Technical Branch of the RAF. Subsequently he became a student at the London School of Economics then assistant lecturer, lecturer, and reader in economics, and for the past four years he has been Tooke professor of economic science and statistics.

Prior, Arthur Norman

(1914– ).

Professor of philosophy, University of Manchester.

Arthur Norman Prior was born at Masterton, New Zealand, on 4 December 1914 and educated at Wairarapa College. He then continued his studies at the University of Otago and graduated master of arts. In 1937 he became an assistant lecturer in philosophy at the University of Otago. He served with the RNZAF, 1942-45. From 1946 to 1958 he was on the staff of the philosophy department at Canterbury University College as lecturer, senior lecturer, and, for the final five years, as professor. During this time he was John Locke lecturer in the University of Oxford for 1956 and visiting professor of philosophy in the University of Chicago for 1952. Since 1959 he has held the chair of philosophy at the University of Manchester. He published Logic and the Basis of Ethics in 1949, Formal Logic in 1955, and Time and Modality in 1957. As well as contributing articles to philosophic journals, he has been an editor of the Journal of Symbolic Logic since 1960.

Rudall, Kenneth Maclaurin

(1910– ).

Reader in biomolecular structure, Leeds University.

Kenneth Maclaurin Rudall was born at Motukaraka, near Hokianga, New Zealand, on 11 September 1910 and educated at Auckland Grammar School before gaining a science degree at Auckland University College. He was awarded a Sir James Gunson scholarship and a national research scholarship and undertook post-graduate work at Massey Agricultural College. This led to further research at Leeds University, where he held a clothworkers fellowship and the Ackroyd fellowship and was awarded doctorates in philosophy and science. His current position is that of reader in biomolecular structure at Leeds University where he is also an honorary lecturer at the medical school. He has carried out research on the biology of wool and hair growth and on the structure of proteins and poly-saccharides.

Smith, John Charles

(1900– ).

Reader in organic chemistry, Oxford University.

John Charles Smith was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 19 January 1900 and attended Wellington College, 1913–16, before completing a bachelor of science degree at Victoria University College.He studied at Auckland University College for a master's degree and, as an 1851 Exhibition scholar, did post-graduate work at Manchester University and Graz (Austria) for a doctorate in philosophy. He also holds the degrees of master of arts and doctor of science from Oxford University. He was assistant to the professor of industrial chemistry at McGill University in Montreal, 1926–27; with the Canadian Pulp and Paper Industry, 1928; demonstrator in organic chemistry, Oxford, 1931–54; and reader in organic chemistry of Oxford University, his present post. During the Second World War he did research work on war gases and aero-engine fuels, and in 1955 undertook research in Pretoria and Melbourne on a Royal Society grant and Nuffield Foundation Commonwealth bursary.

Sutton, Harry, Callender

(1924– ).

Senior lecturer in radiophysics, Edinburgh University.

Harry Callender Sutton was born at Invercargill, New Zealand, on 16 June 1924 and educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. He graduated master of science at Canterbury University College and was awarded a Shirtcliffe research scholarship. He then became attached to the Christchurch laboratories of the British Empire Cancer Campaign Society. Research into the chemical effects of ionising radiations was financed by the society and was undertaken in England at the Universities of Durham, Leeds, and Cambridge; he was awarded a doctorate in philosophy from Durham University. This research was continued at the Otago Medical School when he returned to New Zealand. In 1956, however, he accepted a research fellowship at the Medical College of St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, and this led to his present position, senior lecturer in radiochemistry, natural philosophy department, at Edinburgh University.

Syme, Sir Ronald

(1903– ).

Camden professor of ancient history, Oxford University.

Sir Ronald Syme was born at Eltham, New Zealand, on 11 March 1903 and educated in New Zealand before proceeding to Oriel College, Oxford, where he took his first-class honours in Literae Humaniores in 1927. He was a fellow of Trinity College, 1929–49, since when he has been Camden professor of ancient history at Oxford. During the Second World War he was Press Attaché with the rank of First Secretary at the British Legation, Belgrade, 1940–41; and at the Embassy, Ankara, 1941–42. Until the end of the war he was professor of classical philology at the University of Istanbul. Sir Ronald's contributions to classical studies have been recognised by the Universities of Durham and New Zealand, who conferred honorary doctorates upon him in 1952 and 1949 respectively. He was elected F.B.A. in 1944, became an honorary fellow of Oriel College in 1958, and was knighted in 1959. As well as contributing chapters in the Cambridge Ancient History, he has published The Roman Revolution (1939), Tacitus (two volumes, 1958), Colonial Elites (1958), and articles in learned journals.

Taylor, Harold McCarter, C.B.E.

(1907– ).

Vice-chancellor of University of Keele and principal, University College of North Staffordshire.

Harold McCarter Taylor was born at Dunedin, New Zealand, on 13 May 1907 and educated at Otago Boys' High School. He graduated master of science in 1928 from the University of Otago and entered Clare College, Cambridge, in that year. He gained a Ph.D. in mathematics in 1933 and was elected a fellow of Clare College. From 1934 to 1945 he was a lecturer in mathematics at the University of Cambridge. His war service was with the Royal Artillery as Major and Lieutenant-Colonel; finally, he became Senior Instructor of Gunnery at the School of Artillery, Larkhill. From 1945 he held the position of university treasurer until 1953, when he was appointed secretary-general of the faculties at Cambridge University. In 1961 he held an appointment as principal of the University College of North Staffordshire and, since 1962, has been vice-chancellor of the University of Keele.

Whittle, Peter

(1927– ).

Professor of mathematical statistics, University of Manchester.

Peter Whittle was born at Wellington, New Zealand, on 27 February 1927 and educated at Victoria University College, where he graduated M.Sc in 1949. Subsequently he worked at the University of Uppsala in Sweden and gained a Ph.D. in mathematics. When he returned to New Zealand in 1953 he was employed by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research for four years. In 1956 he was awarded a research medal by the New Zealand Association of Scientists, and in the following year was at Canberra as senior research fellow at the Australian National University. He spent another short period with the New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research until his appointment in 1959 as lecturer in mathematics at the University of Cambridge. In 1961 he became professor of mathematical statistics at the University of Manchester.

The above biographies by no means complete the list of New Zealanders who hold important positions in the universities of the United Kingdom. Among others who may be mentioned are: J. F. Bennett (Greymouth), lecturer in moral science, at Cambridge; G. L. Cawkwell (Auckland), fellow in ancient history, of Oxford; F. G. G. Coleman (Wellington), lecturer in comparative philology, Cambridge; M. R. Fisher (Auckland), director of studies in economics, Downing College, Cambridge; F. Fortune (Palmerston North), lecturer in social anthropology, Cambridge; D. Gray (Wellington), lecturer in English language and literature, Pembroke College, Oxford; D. E. Schultz, (Canterbury), lecturer in engineering, Oxford; H. J. Hanham (Auckland), lecturer in government, Manchester; P. G. Harris (Marton), lecturer in geochemistry, Leeds; V. Heine (Wanga-nui), fellow of Clare College, Cambridge; I. S. Laurie (Wellington), lecturer in medieval French studies, Cambridge; R. S. McGregor (Ashburton), lecturer in Hindi, School of Oriental and African Studies, London; T. H. McPherson (Dunedin), lecturer in philosophy, North Wales; and J. M. Ziman (Hamilton), lecturer in physics, Cambridge.

13. Writers

Like our expatriate artists, the writers living in Great Britain have won success in various fields — James Courage as a novelist, Dorothy Eden as a writer of suspense stories, Geoffrey Cox as a journalist, and so on. Some earn their living purely by writing; others supplement their literary work by permanent positions in other fields.

Hector Bolitho was born at Auckland in 1897 and began journalism on the staff of the Auckland Star. His interest in people and travel has led to the publication of over 30 biographies and books of travel, including The Reign of Queen Victoria; Jinnah, Creator of Pakistan: Albert the Good; and A Century of British Monarchy. During the Second World War he joined the RAF Intelligence Section. He is a fellow of the Royal Societies of Literature and Arts and now lives in Sussex. For some years he has been chairman of W.R.A.P. (Writing and Reading Aids for the Paralysed).

Elsie Cash, who has published a number of historical novels, was born in Otago and spent a few years on the stage in Australia before turning to journalism in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and England. During the First World War she worked in the Royal Arsenal and during the Second World War in an intelligence section. Among her books about royalty and famous people are The Romance of the Queens of England, Royal Elizabeths, The Coronation Book of George VI and Queen Elizabeth, Thomas and Jane Carlyle, and Charles and Mary Lamb.

James Courage, born in 1903 at Christchurch, was educated at Christ's College, Christchurch. He then went to St. John's College, Oxford, where he graduated bachelor of arts. For 10 years he was manager of a bookshop in Hampstead, but after recovering from a serious illness he turned to writing novels, short stories, plays, and a little poetry. One of his first plays, Private History, was performed at the Gate Theatre, London, in 1938. His novels are One House, The Fifth Child, Desire Without Content, Fire in the Distance, The Young Have Secrets, The Call Home, A Way of Love, and The Visit to Penmorten. Courage died in Hampstead, London, on 5 October 1963.

Geoffrey Cox was born at Palmerston North in 1910 and educated at Southland Boys' High School and the University of Otago. In 1932 he was awarded a Rhodes scholarship, graduating bachelor of arts from Oriel College, Oxford. His first position was as a reporter and foreign correspondent for the News Chronicle and, later, for the Daily Express. As war correspondent he covered the Spanish Civil War and the Russian-Finnish War and the invasion of Belgium and France. He joined the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in 1940 and became Chief Intelligence Officer in the Second New Zealand Division serving in Greece, Crete, Libya, and Italy. During his service he was twice mentioned in dispatches and was awarded the M.B.E. In 1943 he was First Secretary at the New Zealand Legation in Washington and a representative at the first UNRRA Conference. After the war he rejoined the News Chronicle as political correspondent till 1954, then as assistant editor until 1956. During this period he was a regular contributor to BBC sound and television services. Since 1956 he has been editor of Independent Television News and in 1959 was awarded C.B.E. His publications include Defence of Madrid and The Red Army Moves.

Daniel Davin, who is assistant secretary to the Delegates of the Oxford University Press, was born at Invercargill in 1913. He was educated at Sacred Heart College, Auckland, and Auckland University College, where he graduated master of arts and was awarded a Rhodes scholarship in 1935. He did post-graduate work at Balliol College, Oxford, 1936–39. On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and, in 1940, the New Zealand Army. For his services in the Middle East he was awarded the M.B.E. and was mentioned in dispatches three times. After demobilisation he joined the Clarendon Press, Oxford. His published works include Cliffs of Fall (1945), For the Rest of Our Lives (1947), Roads from Home (1949), The Sullen Bell (1956), No Remittance (1959), and Crete (1953).

Dorothy Eden spent her childhood on a small Canterbury dairy farm. Until she established herself as a writer she did secretarial work with a legal firm. Apart from a historical novel on New Zealand, Sleep in the Woods, most of her 20 novels are stories of suspense. She is on the committee of the English Crime Writers Association and lives permanently in London.

A New Zealander very well known in London for many years was Angus John Harrop, who died on 10 August 1963 on his return from a visit to this country. He had always maintained a very close connection with his native land, both as a journalist and a historian, and was agent in the United Kingdom for the University of New Zealand, 1931–43, and agent for Canterbury University College, 1931–50. Angus Harrop was born in Hokitika in 1900 and held degrees of M.A., D.Litt. from Canterbury University College, and Ph.D. from Cambridge. He was author of many books on New Zealand, but is best known to New Zealanders in England for the New Zealand News. He founded this paper in 1927 and since then, with the assistance of his wife Hilda, née Valentine, has been editor of the paper.

Andrew Carr Mackenzie, journalist and author, was born at Oamaru and educated at Wellington College. He spent 10 years on the staff of the Evening Post in Wellington, 1928–38, before going to England, where he took a position on the editorial staff of Kemsley Newspapers. He has six novels to his credit.

Mary Somerville was born in New Zealand and educated privately; she then went to Somerville College, Oxford, where she graduated bachelor of arts in 1925. In 1924 she had organised experimental talks for schools broadcast by the BBC. She joined their staff the following year as Schools Assistant. By 1929 she was promoted to the position of Director of School Broadcasting, which she held till 1947. From then till 1950 she was Assistant Controller, Talks Division, after which she became Controller of Talks Division till she retired in 1955. A number of her short stories and articles have been published by English and American periodicals. In 1935 she was awarded the O.B.E. and in 1943 the University of Manchester conferred on her an honorary master of arts degree. She died in 1964.

A playwright from Auckland, Bruce Stewart, is becoming widely known for his television plays and as a writer of serials for the BBC Sound Division. He was at one time with the New Zealand Theatre Co. and was also a radio announcer in Auckland. His latest television play is The Sin Shifter, and one of his bestknown radio plays is The Day of the Galah.

Born in 1890, Robert Sencourt studied at St. John's College, Auckland, New Zealand, before proceeding to St. John's College, Oxford, to qualify as B.Litt. He was attached to the Central India Horse, 1915–16, and then to the General Staff, Simla-Delhi, 1917–18. For two years after the First World War he worked in the India Office. Subsequently he held the chairs in English at the Universities of Lisbon and Lahore. From 1933 to 1935 he was Vice-dean of the faculty of arts and professor of English literature in the University of Egypt. He has contributed to leading British and American literary periodicals and has published many books – India in English Literature, Spain's Uncertain Crown, Winston Churchill, Life of Newman, St. John of the Cross, and Heirs of Tradition.

Next Part: UNITED STATES


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This information was published in 1966 in An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock. It has not been corrected and will not be updated.

Up-to-date information can be found elsewhere in Te Ara.


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